The Intersection of IT, Facility Management and the Internet of Things (IoT)

I have been involved in church for over 56 years (born into a pastor’s home) and have served the church facility “market” for about 32 of those years. I can tell you first hand that for the majority of my association and work with churches, the church tends to be laggards when it comes to adopting new trends, means, methods…and technology. This is not a slam on the “church” as an organization, but just a reality.

It is true that many churches are now keeping up with trends and in many cases leading the charge (especially with sound systems, video production, etc). Think about the YouVersion Bible app (Happy 10th anniversary!). They are actually leading the way. Also, think how online giving and text-to-give is almost as common place as the offering plate.

There is a technology that is trending that I believe will impact all aspects of your world…including church…so let’s get familiar with it – Internet of Things (IoT). According to a Forbes article, it can be described as:

Simply put this is the concept of basically connecting any device with an on and off switch to the Internet (and/or to each other). This includes everything from cell phones, coffee makers, washing machines, headphones, lamps, wearable devices and almost anything else you can think of. This also applies to components of machines, for example a jet engine of an airplane or the drill of an oil rig. As I mentioned, if it has an on and off switch then chances are it can be a part of the IoT. The analyst firm Gartner says that by 2020 there will be over 26 billion connected devices…that’s a lot of connections (some even estimate this number to be much higher, over 100 billion). The IoT is a giant network of connected “things” (which also includes people). The relationship will be between people-people, people-things, and things-things.

So what does this all mean for churches…YOUR church?

Here is what I see happening and where we are heading:

  1. Major facility systems will be more integrated with themselves and with their management tools (i.e Church Management Software and Event Scheduling Software).
  2. Given the incorporation of API’s (Application Programming Interface – a software intermediary that allows two applications to talk to each other), more and more of this integration is going to interact via API’s and not through proprietary protocols.
  3. So…seeing that API’s are an IT world widget and not an everyday Facility Management tool, the IT department at your church will play a much larger role in the selection, implementation, training and maintaining of these systems (via IoT).
  4. Most of these IoT integrations will require Ethernet or WiFi connectivity which may require the incorporation of Firewalls, networks, servers, static IP’s, cloud connectivity and storage, etc, etc, etc.
  5. These applications will likely have cost and budget implications. Some will have significant reductions in cost as we become more effective and efficient…but some of the savings may be offset by subscriptions, hardware, software and the maintaining of the same.
  6. That leads to to the real crux…IT and Facilities must collaborate.
    • They must communicate.
    • They must seek information from each other before decisions are made.
    • They must determine the WHY they need an application before they decide on the WHAT and HOW.
    • It may also require budget discussions. As stated above, there may be cost savings and offsets. Whose budgets do these savings and costs impact? Same for staffing.

As you can see…this is not to be taken lightly…and unless you plan to continue to live in a cave rubbing 2 sticks together to make fire, this is coming to us all. Remember, the iPhone is only 11 years old…and yet if feels like we have always had one (or similar).

Is this on your radar?  If not, if needs to be!

4 Reasons Why Connecting Spaces Trump Cattle Chutes

When I started my career in church facility development in 19XX (you venture a guess), the foyer/lobby/narthex (for my liturgical friends) was generally sized to be 1-2 square feet per seat in the main worship space. In those days, this space was intended to be used as a place to funnel people from the worship space to the outside or down a series of narrow corridors that led to the education, administration or fellowship areas. There was often a small table for giving/tithing envelopes or general information along with 1-2 uncomfortable high-back chairs…usually not ones you would enjoy sitting in for any length of time, nor were they arranged in a manner to encourage conversation or community.

For all practicality, the foyer was nothing more than a well appointed cattle chute (MOO).
Not anymore.

That line of thinking has fortunately gone the way of the dodo-bird. Why? Because people want to connect. People want to do life together. We want to linger. We want to hangout. We want to do more than just pass through a space to merely get to the other side.

Let’s look at 4 reasons why this is a major shift in church space:

  1. People Want Connection– In “Mistakenly Seeking Solitude,” published in The Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Professor Nicolas Epley from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and co-author Juliana Schroder found that participants in their experiments not only underestimated others’ interest in connecting, but also reported positive experiences by both being spoken to and to speaking with a stranger.

“Connecting with strangers on a train may not bring the same long-term benefits as connecting with friends,” Epley states. “But commuters on a train into downtown Chicago reported a significantly more positive commute when they connected with a stranger than when they sat in solitude.”

Deep down, we want to connect with others.

“People want to connect. People want to do life together. We want to linger. We want to hangout. We want to do more than just pass through a space to merely get to the other side.”

  1. Community– Over the past half decade or more,  the term “doing life together” has become a mainstay in modern vernacular. We are seeking the opportunity to connect with people. For the past 30-50 years the American population has become experts at separatism, isolationism and back yard living…fences and all. If we are ever invaded by extra terrestrial beings, they will report back to the mother ship that Earthlings vacate their domiciles early in the morning…then return late evening and are not see again until the next morning. However, the trend is the opposite. Ask the people of Celebration, Florida. Talk to masses of people moving back into urban and walk-able settings. People are seeking community…why not let the church lead the way in this cultural shift instead of being the typical laggards.
  2. Death of the Fellowship Hall– Several years ago, Dr. Thom Rainer conducted a research project that identified the least effective and “inspirational” type of construction/development project was the “fellowship hall”. While community is desirable, the idea of a contrived or forced “community” setting is not working. Frankly, the dedicated fellowship hall is a very poor utilization of space and tends to become the dreaded multi-useless building. Properly sized lobby spaces can more than suffice for these “fellowship” functions…so why do we need to pay for the space twice?
  3. Third Place and the “Well”– In the early to mid 1990’s the term “Third Place” (thanks to the book  The Great Good Place, by Ray Oldenburg) came in vogue referencing the third place in a person’s life that they would engage them with others (the first place is where you live…the second is where you go to pay for where you live…and the third place was that comfortable place where you could unwind, get away, hang, connect, etc.) The most popular example of a Third Place was from the TV sitcom, “Cheers”…where “everyone knows your name”. In the majority of instances where churches talked about a third place, it referred to a coffee shop or cafe. While that is “an” option, it is not the only option. In fact, I would prefer to talk about “wells” (vs. Temples) as the draw. Think about the women at the well. She did not wake up and decide to go to the temple or “church”.  No. She had to do a 7-day a week event…get water. Part of her culture and daily routine. But she met God in the form of Jesus at the well. After her encounter, she ran home…but did not load up the family station wagon and drive her family to the temple. Nope…she took them to the WELL. Think about that…how can we develop more wells on our campus?

Given the above as well as many other cultural and practical influences, we are seeing these gathering/connecting spaces…what might be called the “commons”…be at least 50% the size of the worship seating with a preferred factor of 75-100% of the worship seating space. If we use 8-10 SF per person for worship seating, that means we need to allocate 4-10 SF per person in the common space vs. 1-2 SF.  In fact, one of the industry partners we collaborate with is trending their designs and concepts closer to 150%. That is a ton of space…and there are times that not all of it needs to be included in the “built environment” but can be captured in adjacent spaces outside the building and create an inside/outside commons that can be equally as effective and in many cases, be even more inviting. If you design your commons to be 75%  of your worship seating, but also an additional 75% in natural environments, you could potentially save enormous amounts of money as the conditioned space might cost you, say, $150/SF or even more while the exterior space would be in the $30-40/SF range. That is a 75% savings.

Bottom line is we need to provide common connecting spaces and not just a cattle chute. You need to determine what is contextual for your church, culture, DNA and other such factors.


eSPACE Now Unlocks Doors

That’s right…you heard us. Not only is eSPACE the industry leading Facility Management Software…it is also the leader in Facility System Integrations.

Nearly 9 years ago we developed the first COOLSPACE integration with the Niagara Framework for HVAC Building Automation Systems. Since then, we have developed even more (see HERE for a more information on this).

Well…we have taken facility system integration to the next level…and that is to allow eSPACE or your Event Scheduler (remember eSPACE integrates with 14 other Church Management Systems) but to also unlock and lock doors. BOOM!!!!

  • No more late night trips back to the church to make sure the doors are locked.
  • No more double entry of schedules in the event scheduler and your door system (or HVAC system).
  • Enter events one time and be DONE!

You can now create and approve your event in eSPACE (or one of our ChMS integration partners) and simultaneously communicate with your HVAC systems when to come on and off…AND…determine which door(s) you want unlocked/locked for that event. This is FREAKING AWESOME!

There are, however, some requirements from you…such as:
  1. You need to have an access control system
  2. That system needs to have an API that we can communicate with
See…that wasn’t so bad.

Do we have your attention?  If so, reach out and let us know how we can help you increase operational efficiency as well as what your facility uses. We are more than happy to investigate and make this a reality for YOUR team!

PS:  Lighting and  security cameras are next on the integration train to efficiency!


500+ Reasons to Join Church Facility Management Solutions

A number of months ago we announced the release of the ONLY Online Community/Forum 100% focused on Church Facility Management. This community is the only one of its kind and we have seen great response. In fact, we have nearly 500 who have joined to improve their Facility Stewardship prowess.

Want to know why?

Church facility management is the responsibility of all churches…any size…everywhere…all denominations…all colors…all styles. Get my point?!?!  The data being provided as part of Church Facility Management Solutions…the content…the resources…the webinars…the access to other church professionals…the access to vendors and the like is incredible and this is the only resource on the market focused on this topic.

Don’t just take our word on it…here are what the CFMS members are saying:

Just joined today and I am very impressed with this website. I have been Facilities Manager for almost 3 years and I wish I had known about this site when I started this job. Looking forward to gaining more knowledge and insight . Thanks Tim – Bill Dickerson

 

Thank you for making this Free! Most churches are running on shoe strings and duct tape so this opens up for greater participation. I have been in the corporate facilities/real estate for 24 years and I am always learning new things. Looking forward to gleaning and sharing. Thanks – Steve Armstrong

As a reminder, your FREE CFMS membership provides you:

  1. Weekly Information sent directly to you to help you be proactive and intentional with the care of your facility.
  2. Online Community so that you can get input and feedback from hundreds of other church and facility leaders.
  3. Monthly Webinars by industry professionals to provide relevant information and resources for your church facility management.
  4. Vetted Vendors will put a list of qualified vendors at your fingertips with the assurance that they have been pre-qualified by our team…and they do not pay to be on this list.
  5. Free Resources will be developed and made available to members including worksheet, forms, policy docs, job descriptions, etc.
  6. Availability to Consulting and Training Services.

Join us TODAY completely FREE!

Regardless of your church size, you need to be thinking about the best use and management of your facilities. There is no better place than this community. It offers the best of church facility expertise along with peer learning. You should not be without this resource!

Thom S. Rainer, President and CEO

LifeWay Christian Resources

Church Answers


Church Revitalization: Boat Anchor OR Fresh Wind in the Sails?

Church Revitalization is alive and well.  This is not the “Church Growth” movement of the 1980’s or “Seeker Sensitive” or some other fad. Frankly, “CHURCH” revitalization has less to do (in my opinion) with the age or condition of a congregation as much as a revitalization of the purpose (the WHY) of the church universal.

We have seen some incredible initiatives the past 10+ years related to revitalization and church multiplication. The most obvious and most publicized are Church Planting and Multisite Church. Both are alive and well and growing in impact.

“We need to be cognizant to not burden the next generation of church leaders with facilities that will become the boat anchor around their ministry and missional impact.”

But there has been an upswell of 2 additional initiatives that need to be mentioned.  These may be subsets of the above; however, they bring an additional set of impactful elements and I believe they have significant nuances that need attention:

  1. Mergers – Our team has served several churches the past few years that have merged to not just “rescue” a declining church, but rather to form a stronger, more vibrant and impactful church. As Jim Tomberlin and Warren Bird have so well stated – BETTER TOGETHER!
  2. Revitalization/Redeveloped/Adoptive Re-Use – So many terms we could use here…but we see a trend (for the good) of revitalization and adaptive use of facilities that have either aged out or are underutilized and/or a “highest and best use” that may not be exclusive of a 1-day-a-week church facility.

A deeper dive into the above is merited, but that is for another day. Instead, I want to share a concern I am seeing with both of the above when we are not intentional. Both of the above are exciting…and they are a great way to not only grow the Kingdom/Church (capital “C”) but to breathe new life into aging church facilities.

HOWEVER…there are 4 critical considerations that both the “giver” and the receiver of such facility gifts need to consider:

1. Functional Obsolescenceis a reduction in the usefulness or desirability of an object because of an outdated design feature, usually one that cannot be easily changed. Here are some prime examples:

  • Not handicap accessible
  • Inadequate HVAC system
  • Flow feels more like a maze than an intentionally community space
  • Lots of stairs
  • “Wrong-sized” spaces
  • Limited parking

2. Incongruent/Non-contextual – In many cases, the “gift” does not communicate the story of the receiver. It may be in the wrong part of town…may feel like a monastery and not a thriving community-centric facility…or it may just be old looking, feeling, and smelling.

3. Deferred Maintenance – “Here is your FREE Building.” – Oh Goodie…but what about the $3-4M in deferred maintenance. Don’t miss this. I have seen too many well intended churches and church planting organizations hand over an older facility to a church plant or even a multisite campus that appears to be “free” only to find they had been give the MONEY PIT. Free is rarely ever free.

4. Uninsurable – Directly related to the above, make sure the facility being gifted is actually insurable. Put yourself in this scenario…you are the pastor of a church plant…you are gifted a facility only to learn that the facility in not insurable or the insurance cost, due to its condition, has massive deductibles and/or unsustainable premiums. OUCH!

We need to be cognizant to not burden the next generation of church leaders with facilities that will become the boat anchor around their ministry and missional impact.


What Goes Up…

Admit it…you were finishing the rest of the verse to that song. Well, we are not talking about spinning wheels today, we are talking about one of the most ignored parts of your facility…the roof.

We generally do not think of our roofs until we experience an issue. Considering a properly installed roof can last several decades with very little issues, when we notice them it may be a very big deal to rectify. Unfortunately, many of us do not know what to look for or how to perform preventative maintenance on a roof.

It starts with understanding what type of roof system (or systems) your facility has. It could have shingles, be a metal roof, a single-ply membrane, a built-up, or any combination of roofing types depending on the size of your facility. Not just the material type is important, the slope of your roof is important as well. The steeper the slope, the more specialized the contractor needs to be in order to properly and safely work on it. It is hard to make repairs on a surface that you are not comfortable working on. The converse is true as well; a low slope roof takes someone who knows what they are doing to ensure drainage occurs the way it is supposed to.

If you have not gathered the data on your roofs, now is the time. You should have the size of the roof (I prefer using roof squares as the unit of measure), the type of roof, brand/color of the material, warranty information, and a record of inspections and repairs. You should also have a preventative maintenance schedule. The most important part of a preventative maintenance plan for your roof is simple: regular visual inspection.

I know that seems simplistic. The reality is we often wait until we see the issue from the bottom of the roof (leaks coming through the ceiling). Inspecting the roof annually helps us to spot the problems before they make it through the many layers to the ceiling. By the time an area becomes saturated enough to leak inside, there is damage to the substrate, the surrounding building materials, the insulation, as well as the potential for mold.

When we are thinking of the roof, it is also important to talk a bit about flashing. Flashing refers to any water-resistant material that is used in a roof system at the transition between the roof and another building element, a change in roof plane, or a roof penetration. Essentially, flashing is installed anywhere the roof is not able to lay on a singular plane uninterrupted. Proper flashing helps keep water out, improper flashing invites water in. Most roof leaks can be traced back to a failure in flashing. Many times, areas that are deteriorating can be quickly addressed with a proper sealant; assuming of course that you are looking for them every year.

I could go on regarding roof maintenance and inspection…but I have a better idea. Church Facility Management Solutions is providing a FREE webinar this month on Roofing. We will be going over roofing types and how to maintain them to extend their life. Why not join us, hear some great info, and get the chance to ask questions of or team of experts? We look forward to seeing you there!


4 Steps to Conquering Deferred Maintenance

Deferred maintenance is a term that gets thrown around a lot and yet I find many people have no real idea what it means. Let’s start with a definition:

Deferred maintenance is the practice of postponing maintenance activities such as repairs on both real property and personal property (i.e. machinery) in order to save costs, meet budget funding levels, or realign available budget monies. The failure to perform needed repairs could lead to asset deterioration and ultimately asset impairment. Generally, a policy of continued deferred maintenance may result in higher costs, asset failure, and in some cases, health and safety implications. (Wikipedia.com)

In a previous blog entitled “The “4 X” Reality of Deferred Maintenance” we provided some very sobering realities from national research projects…here they are again:

“Every $1 in deferred maintenance costs $4 of capital renewal needs in the future.”

“If a necessary repair is deferred and allowed to remain in service until the next level of failure, the resultant expense will be 30-times the early intervention cost.”

If those 2 statements do not shake you up a little, then you may need to see a doctor or psychiatrist. If you believe EVERYTHING belongs to God…and that HE has ENTRUSTED His ministry facilities to us to STEWARD…then you cannot take this lightly.

Let’s explore what the keys are to conquering deferred maintenance.

1. Identify YOUR deferred maintenance – The first step in nearly any issue in life is to first recognize there is an issue. If we do not acknowledge there is an issue, how can we resolve it? In most churches, there is a lack of understanding of what their deferred maintenance issue are. We get so busy with budgets, “doing church”, break/fix items, etc that we do not stop to take time to see the trees for the forest. In many cases, even if you took the time, you may not know what you are looking for. This is where a set of “FRESH EYES” can be beneficial.

2. Provide adequate general maintenance budgets – Over the past couple years, we have done facility assessments for several million square feet of church facilities. The aggregate amount of deferred maintenance has been in the tens of millions of dollars. That is sad!  The “church” claims to be an organization focused on being “good stewards” and yet we allow our buildings to deteriorate right under our feet. In every single case, the General Maintenance budget was under-funded. There was not enough money in the budget to keep up with the natural rate of physical deterioration. Check out this quote from Kevin Folsom, former Facilities Director at Dallas Theological Seminary:

“There are numerous levels that can be used to go about this, but to start we have to remember our early Physics lessons in high school about the 2nd Law of Thermal Dynamics. Everything we build will decay, but it may last longer if properly maintained. So, here’s a puzzling question…If we build facilities that the natural law causes them to decay at fairly predictable rates throughout its birth to burial, why do we not plan for it?”

The best way to conquer deferred maintenance is to have a budget that addresses the natural decay and deterioration of your facility.

3. Properly “staff” your facility team – In every instance referenced above, not only was the budget under-funded, but they were under-staffed…and not by just a little! If you only have enough staff to address the break/fix emergencies of the urgent, then how do you expect to stay on top of the natural decay and deterioration? Quick answer…YOU CAN’T! Based on national surveys by our firm and IFMA, we believe the number of facility staff for a well-run organization is one Full Time Facility Staff Employee for every 25,000 – 35,000 SF. This is not for cleaning…that is another story…this is for general maintenance.

4. Have a Properly funded Capital Reserve PlanGentlemen…this is a football! Church leader…capital replacement is not an “IF” consideration but rather a “WHEN” and “HOW MUCH”.  You WILL replace every HVAC unit.  You WILL replace all your carpet.  You WILL replace your roof. You WILL have to re-surface your parking lot. To turn a blind eye to the need of a capital reserve fund is kin to telling God that the laws of science and natural resources…that HE created…don’t apply to your church. You are above the laws of God. REALLY?!?! Do you have a 401K or similar account for the future or do you assume retirement or old age is not part of your future…that it does not apply to you?

If we were proactive with our operational budgets and capital reserves, there would not be any deferred maintenance. In a perfect world, we would properly fund our general maintenance budget to keep the building in the best physical condition as possible…AND…we would have adequate capital reserves when we approach “end of life” of our facility component.

That is how you conquer Deferred Maintenance. To quote Sean Connery in The Untouchables“What are you prepared to do?”


CAPITAL RESERVE PLANNINGAlmost every component of your facilities will have to be replaced at some point. Do you have an action plan? INTENTIONAL organizations plan today for tomorrow’s costs. That’s why it’s critical you establish a capital reserve account now.

Download our FREE guide to learn more. 

 

Preventive Maintenance: Revisited

The below is a post that I did in August of 2009…but think that we need to revisit it…and how it can save you money in the long run. Frankly, if we are focused on long term ministry implementation, then our facilities will need to be prepared to serve us (not vice versa) for the long term as well. OK…I will get off my soap box…enjoy the following!


As I have studied the Facilities Management field and have researched the cause and effect of the decay of everything that we build, I am more confused as to why we, as God’s stewards, do such a poor job of fulfilling those duties. We would rather put off today what we can go into debt for tomorrow. HMMM…is that good stewardship? Sounds like many government officials.

I recently was introduced to Kevin Folsom, Director of Facilities and Plant Operations Dallas Theological Seminary, Dallas, Texas. He wrote a White Paper entitled “sustainable facilities” vs. Sustainable Facilities. This is an excellent article and frankly some of it is over my head…Kevin is one smart dude!!!!

Here is a quote from this article:

There are numerous levels that can be used to go about this, but to start we have to remember our early Physics lessons in high school about the 2nd Law of Thermal Dynamics. Everything we build will decay, but it may last longer if properly maintained. So, here’s a puzzling question… If we build facilities that the natural law causes them to decay at fairly predictable rates throughout its birth to burial, why do we not plan for it?

According to a research project done a few years ago, facilities…any facility…will deteriorate at a rate of 1-4% per year, assuming regular preventive maintenance. However, this rate of deterioration will, in most cases, grow exponentially if the regular, systematic preventive maintenance is not performed.

So…why do we, as church leaders, avoid addressing and planning for the inevitable? Would you drive your new car and never change the oil until the engine seizes up and then cough over a huge amount of money for a new engine? That does not make any sense to me.

Let me share one more quote from an interview Kevin did with facilitiesnet.

Let’s step back and look at the big picture for a minute. An appropriate preventive maintenance program should be funded on average at 1.5 percent of the CRV (Current Replacement Value) of a facility. Using the Fram analogy, which is much like a really small facility, 1.5 percent of a $20,000 car is $300 per year. The equivalent would be to pay someone to come to your car’s location to provide maintenance and inspections, while working around your schedule to prevent interruption. That sounds like a pretty good deal to me.

So, how much is the CRV (Current Replacement Value) of your ministry facilities? How much are you budgeting each year to maintain these God given resources? It may be time for a Facilities Management/Maintenance Audit.


Cheap Is No Bargain

 

“It is unwise to pay too much, but it is worse to pay too little.
The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot … it can’t be done. When you deal with the lowest bidder, it is wise to add something for the risk you run, and if you do that you will have enough to pay for something better!”
John Ruskin (1819-1900)

This simple fact regarding cost was written in the late 1800’s, but it still holds true today. The construction and maintenance industry is full of companies who claim to offer discount service, when in reality they perform “breakdown maintenance”. The scenario usually goes something like this: the building owner or manager calls for service (oftentimes, it’s an emergency); the “discount” company sends someone out to patch things up, and the building owner is led to believe that everything is working fine. A short time later the system fails again, and this cycle continues until the system is in such disrepair that it must be replaced. Now the building owner is faced with a large, unexpected expense.

Maintaining a complex commercial building, like our churches, in this way is like putting a band-aid on a serious injury. I recently heard a radio ad where the store owner was quoting a customer that said that she was “too poor to buy cheap.” That thought coupled with the above is a concept that most of us never fully grasp. I still go to the clearance rack and pick out a style or size that is not exactly what I want…I buy it…then it sits in the closet never to be worn…but hey, I got quite the “deal”. Can you relate?

Now, do not get me wrong, I believe in being prudent. But prudence does not mean buying something that is “cheap” or the “lowest price/bid” because we think it will save us money. I have found that in most cases, the lowest price comes with a price. The “value” of the purchase is usually commensurate with the price…LOW. Let me give you a real life example. I went to Staples the other day to get some printer paper. They had a sale on paper…about $3.00 for a ream…..which is 1/2 of the going rate of what I usually buy. So I bought some…thinking how smart I was. Well, when I actually started to use the paper, I realized that it was a paper-weight less than I usually use and the paper kept curling with the humidity or when it had a lot of ink covering the paper. It also was not as bright white as I would want to use to give a customer. So…was that a smart purchase or not? The paper is sitting under my printer and I only grab it when I need “scrap” paper. I had to make a second trip to Staples and buy the paper that actually met my needs.

What did this escapade actually “cost” me?:

  1. The initial “deal” purchase
  2. The personal frustration with the quality of paper and the horror of what my presentations would have looked like if I used that paper with a potential client
  3. Extra time to drive back to Staples…which equates to lost opportunity time for sales or servicing clients
  4. Additional gasoline and wear and tear on my vehicle
  5. The cost of the purchase of the right paper
  6. Did I mention the TIME this all took!

So, the next time you are making a buying decision…count ALL the potential cost of that “cheap” decision…it will surprise you. There is nothing wrong with buying a lower price product or service if it has the “value” you desire…otherwise you are just buying cheap.


Church Security – Building a Strong Foundation

At Cool Solutions Group we strive to provide the best content to all that are searching for ways to be stewards of what they have been entrusted. In the past few years church safety and security has been a growing focus. We get many calls regarding this, and work with many great partners in the industry to get the best information out to as many as possible.

What we have found is that security is like any other process in a facility. To be successful it must be done intentionally. One of our favorite quotes that is generally attributed to the Greek soldier Archilochus circa 650 B.C. is “We don’t rise to the level of our expectations; we fall to the level of our training”.

That concept is the basis for our new free e-Book series entitled A Measured Approach to Church Security. This series has 4 separate eBooks:

Part 1: Church Security – Preparing for the Process

Part 2: Church Security – Laying a Firm Foundation

Part 3: Church Security – Building Upon the Foundation

Part 4: Church Security – Supported by a Firm Foundation

For a safety and security program in your church to be successful and effective, you will need to have a strong foundation. This series is designed to introduce you to the concepts that allow you to begin building the best program for your church. There are many references provided, some to articles and some to service providers. Take the time to dig deep and begin building and training on a safety and security program that can accomplish your objectives. Developing your response during the storm is the opposite of intentional planning.

Download this FREE series today, and encourage others to do the same. Develop the plan that is right for you and your church culture. We are here to help.