Maintenance Planning – PART 2

Last week we started the discussion on Maintenance Planning…click HERE if you missed that one. WE explored IMMEDIATE and INTERMEDIATE.  This week we will dive into the often forgotten FUTURE.

Before we go into Future, I think it is important to make a distinction. Immediate and Intermediate maintenance are concentrated on those things necessary to maintain the facility in its current state, with the equipment that is currently in use. There is not a “project planning” component to these two types of maintenance. They need to occur regardless. Future maintenance planning is unique in that it can also include plans for facility improvements and changeouts.

For many facility professionals, Future maintenance planning is the more exciting part of the job. This is where all the research and education we perform during the year come into play. We learn about VRF systems, for example, and then we realize that as we look at future facility renovations that VRF is the perfect solution for our HVAC needs. Or maybe we see that the exterior lights are no longer illuminating like they should, so we make plans to change them out to a hybrid solar light.

What you must remember in Future maintenance planning is that all the changes that you are considering will potentially bring about new Immediate and Intermediate maintenance needs. Recommended maintenance on a VRF system is different than a traditional split system. Solar LED lights require some additional maintenance regarding the batteries. Too often, when future improvements are considered, the maintenance cycle is not considered. When you are planning Future maintenance, you should seek to make sure you understand how the improvements will need to be maintained.

As a reminder, the preceding maintenance categories are not the “find it and fix it” maintenance that will occur in any active facility. When you are planning maintenance for the year ahead, it is important to remember that you do not have as much available time as you may think. By creating a calendar, you can also help share the maintenance story to others in the facility. It is not unusual for a “non-maintenance” person to not understand why something cannot be accomplished very quickly. It is not because they don’t care, it is that they simply do not know all that it takes and all that it is competing against. When you look at the Immediate and Intermediate, you may find that out of your week you only have 65% of your time available for “find it and fix it” tasks or new projects. Getting the story told is an important part of maintenance planning.

We want you to be successful in planning your maintenance this year. Proper planning and defining what you need to do will greatly improve your chances for success. That does not mean that you will not have to adjust as the year goes along; you will. But if you take the time to separate and define the Immediate, the Intermediate, and the Future, you will know where you can more easily adjust and accommodate the unknown.

Is Maintenance Planning a priority at your facility? If not, what can you do to change that?

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Don’t Be The First “Taper”

Most behavior patterns start with a single decision that is then never questioned or challenged.  Because it is not challenged it slowly defines your culture (This is how we do things around here) which then leads to the 7 words of any dying organization – “We have always done it that way.”

The above begs an answer to the question…Who made the first decision? Followed by…Was it INTENTIONAL?

Here is a section of a recent blog by Seth Godin that describes this process in no uncertain terms:

I’m sitting on a black couch in the lobby of a nice theater. The couch is cracked and peeling, with seven strips of black gaffer’s tape holding it together. And you don’t have to be an interior geologist to see that it has developed this patina over time, bit by bit.

The question is: Who was the first person who decided to fix the couch with tape?

The third or fifth person did a natural thing–here’s a ratty couch, let’s keep it the best we can.

But the first taper?

The first taper decided that it was okay for this theater to have a taped couch. The first taper didn’t make the effort to alert the authorities, to insist on getting the couch repaired properly.

The first taper decided, “this is good enough for now.”

This is how we find ourselves on the road to decay.

BOOM…this is an excellent example about how deferred maintenance gets started.  A “first taper” makes a conscious decision to “tape” over the problem or worse, ignore it all together.  Then the pattern of unintentional culture kicks in and deferred maintenance runs rampant. (REMINDER: Deferred Maintenance =The practice of postponing maintenance activities such as repairs on real property in order to save costs, meet budget funding levels, or realign available budget monies.)

Don’t be the first “taper.” Set a culture of care, pride of ownership (not your ownership by of the person who actually owns it…God), stewardship and intentionality.

-Tim



 

Who Needs a Facility Condition Assessment?

 

SPOILER ALERT…if your church owns a facility…then the answer is YOU.

Why, you may ask.  Let me explain.

First, what is a Facility Condition Assessment? In layman’s terms, it is simply an assessment and evaluation of the current and projected condition of your church facility. Sounds simple, doesn’t it? Well, it is not quite that simple…let me rephrase…the “definition” of a Facility Condition Assessment is truly that simple, but the guts, deliverables and output (and outcomes) are much more complex. Let me elaborate.

Here is a very concise definition of a Facility Condition Assessment:

Facility Condition Assessments (FCAs) help facility owners understand and maintain the physical condition of their facilities, develop capital budgets (current and future), and prioritize resources (financial and human).

I still look at an FCA as being similar to an annual Medical Physical. I have friends that I know avoid their physicals as they don’t want to know how bad things are or that they should lose 25 pounds or change their diet.  But avoiding the examination does not change the reality of the situation.

Same with your facility.  Not knowing how much deferred maintenance you have or how much money should be budgeted annually or what a capital reserve account should look like, does NOT change the facts. Avoiding reality is just sticking our heads in the sand…and it is flat out irresponsible.

There, I said it!

Here are some comments from your peers who have taken the steps to at least understand and then plan accordingly:

The assessment aided us in establishing a planned capital replacement program in that we were able to prioritize based on life cycle in all the areas assessed. Because of the assessment we were able to get a real look at our deferred items and plan for their renovation or replacement. Clark Byram, FBC Sevierville, Sevierville, TN

 

We are quite a bit behind on capital improvements.  This brought a lot of light to our people regarding where we are with regards to the facilities. Jim Boyd, Calvary Baptist, Winston Salem, NC

 

It showed us the deficiencies in our systems and processes (and lack of accountability) for maintaining our facilities that we as decision-makers could not see from our vantage point, and the functional and financial impact that was going to have.  Justin Greene, Liberty Live, Norfolk, VA

 

Confirmed that deferred maintenance was out of control and that there would be huge savings on utilities if we could ever get HVAC under control. Charles Reynolds, Hermitage Hills Baptist, Nashville, TN

 

Expert valuations of deferred cost/dollars and appropriate annual budget requirements for facility, instead of just in-house estimates or historical basis. Dwayne McDow, Summer Grove Baptist, Shreveport, LA

Love this quote: “What you don’t know will hurt you.” – Jim Rohn

In the case of the condition of your church facility, truer words have not been spoken.

Get in the know! 

-Tim


Retirement Planning…for your Facility

 

Unless the Lord decides to call you home premature, we all will be faced with some variation of “retirement.” That means plans need to be considered for that period in our lives when we are not producing income based on a full time 40-hour +/- work week.  For most, that takes the form of:

  • 401K or 403b
  • IRA’s
  • Annuities
  • Life Insurance
  • Investments
  • Pensions

For others, it may simply be hoping that Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid will be adequate.  I think we would all agree that is not very wise.

We will project what we believe our costs will be in retirement…then plan a strategy to utilize one or more of the above to ensure we have the basis from which to generate the level of income to sustain the desired lifestyle.

This all sounds prudent as we plan for the INEVITABLE stage of life.  Would you agree?

So what are we doing to prepare for the “retirement”of our ministry facilities? I guess the first question is…do you think it is necessary?  If you don’t, then why would you plan for your personal retirement?

Sorry for being snarky…could not help myself.

Even at the very worst of personal financial planning, their is a partial safety net (although tenuous) is Social Security and other entitlements (did you realize that Entitled and Entitlements are not mentioned in the Bible…just saying). Considering our facility retirement concerns, we do not even have a social security safety net.

You may be saying – “We do not plan to retire our facility.” Oh Grasshopper…that is flawed thinking.

You may not “retire” the entire facility…but you WILL retire nearly every component of the facility.

  • You will retire all roofs…and replace them…and retire them again.
  • You will retire all HVAC equipment…and replace them…and retire them again.
  • You will retire all paving…and replace them…and retire them again.
  • You will retire all floor coverings…and replace them…and retire them again.
  • You will retire all lighting, plumbing, windows, doors, etc, etc, etc.

Need I go on?

These facility retires…just like our personal retirement…are INEVITABLE. There is no getting around it.  There no magic bullet.  There is no “Facility Fairy” to wave a wand.

Given the above…what are your plans?  Do you have a plan?  If not, how do you start? What is your baseline? How much is enough?

These are great questions that can and must all be answered…and starting with your current reality is the best place to get going.  In light of that, we strongly recommend a Facility Condition Assessment. Such an assessment will provide you:

  • Fresh Eyes Assessment
  • Life Cycle Assessment
  • Benchmark of Budgets/Staff
  • Deferred Maintenance
  • Facility Management Best Practices
  • Preventive Maintenance
  • Energy/Operational Evaluation
  • Capital Reserve Planning

Make your facilities “retirement” a positive experience by being intentional Facility Stewards.

-Tim


Stop Putting Out Fires

Contribution by Deborah Ike, President and Founder of Velocity Ministry Management

Of course, I’m not talking about actual fires (go ahead and put those out).  I’m referring to those proverbial fires where you’re running from one crisis to the next.  That’s what I see happening all too often with churches and their events.  Every ministry department wants to host several events throughout the year (often “planned” a few weeks instead of a few months ahead of time) PLUS the church as a whole hosts events as well.  All of this activity results in exhausted staff, frustrated volunteers, less-than-optimal events, and a congregation overwhelmed by so many event announcements.

Here’s what I often see:

  • The 1-2 weeks before an event, it’s all-hands-on-deck with nearly every other task dropped so all staff members can focus on last minute details for an event
  • No one knows all of the events coming up for the next 12 months
  • Facilities team members are often caught by surprise with requests for room setup and support
  • No single individual has a full understanding of how event plans are coming along or what’s supposed to happen the day of the event
  • Volunteers are frustrated with a lack of clear direction, training, or communication from staff
  • There are a lot of event planning meetings happening but rarely are firm decisions made or actions taken after those meetings
  • There’s a last-minute rush to try and get enough event volunteers
  • The staff barely finishes one event and already has to scramble to work on the next one…that’s coming up in a couple of weeks

Let’s stop the madness, folks. 

There’s a much easier, less stressful, and a more strategic way to host events at your church.  It involves planning ahead, thinking through what’s best (not just what’s good), and being disciplined in your approach.  It’s a bit like eating nutritious food and exercising.  Neither is super exciting but both result in more energy and better health.

If this problem sounds a bit too familiar, join us for the Proactive Event Planning Webinar on October 25th.  I’ll outline a proven process for planning events – one that will help you plan more impactful and less stressful events for your church.  Click here to reserve your spot today.

I’m looking forward to equipping you with a practical, straightforward process that can yield incredible results for your church.

Your Church Has Been Offered a Facility…Now What?

I was privileged to recently sit with Dr. Thom Rainer and talk about a significant and growing topic…the “adoption” of a used facility.

Dr. Rainer, Jonathan Howe and I discussed facility management and why a free building could be the most expensive building your church has.

Some highlights from this episode include:

  • Total annual operational costs of your church building should run between $5.50-$7.00 per square foot.
  • Does your church facility speak the same language that your church culture speaks?
  • Never accept a free facility without a facility assessment to determine how much it’s really going to cost you.
  • Does your church truly have a grasp on how much your facility costs to run?

Listen to the entire podcast HERE.

You Cannot Do It All

You can be great at a small number of things or mediocre at a great many things. Unfortunately, in the church world, we expect our facility teams to be subject matter experts on a great many different things. As a result, we are getting mediocre results in several areas.

This is not a comment on the ability of the facility team, or on the demands from the church administration. Rather, it is an observation that there is a point in time where the benefit of bringing in outside experts is more profitable in the long term than trying to handle it in-house.

We readily see the benefit in certain “church” processes of seeking outside help (think church vision casting for example). When it comes to the facility, it becomes a much harder sell. There is this weird assumption that the paid facility staff should be able to handle everything. While I feel that facility teams accomplish a great deal more than folks realize, even I can admit that there are things that they simply should not be doing.

Therein lies one of the issues when it comes to outsourcing. What makes sense for one facility to outsource may not make sense for another. Each staff and church is unique in what they need assistance in managing. Some need help cleaning, some in maintenance, yet others only in project work. Determining where you need to outsource starts with making a realistic assessment as to what you and your team can accomplish with excellence. And it is not just executing a task with excellence once; it is what can you consistently perform well no matter the current operational pace.  Once you identify those areas, you can determine what areas are best to outsource.

What do you do then?

Before you start calling around and getting recommendations, you need to consider what results you want to see. It’s best to go into the outsourcing process with an understanding of what acceptable looks like to you. Be prepared to articulate that (in word and in writing) to the companies you are considering. The more you can define your needs, the better the company will be able to propose a scope and level of work that is appropriate. Effective and intentional communication is required if you want to have a successful experience.

What should we consider next?

For you, you should consider attending the free Church Facility Management Webinar on August 23rd. We will go to details on outsourcing, what to consider, what to ask for, and a great deal more. Navigate on over to www.cfms.cool and check us out, or click here to reserve your spot today.  Let us help you develop and understand how to leverage outsourcing as you work to steward your facility effectively.

 

500+ Reasons to Join Church Facility Management Solutions

A number of months ago we announced the release of the ONLY Online Community/Forum 100% focused on Church Facility Management. This community is the only one of its kind and we have seen great response. In fact, we have nearly 500 who have joined to improve their Facility Stewardship prowess.

Want to know why?

Church facility management is the responsibility of all churches…any size…everywhere…all denominations…all colors…all styles. Get my point?!?!  The data being provided as part of Church Facility Management Solutions…the content…the resources…the webinars…the access to other church professionals…the access to vendors and the like is incredible and this is the only resource on the market focused on this topic.

Don’t just take our word on it…here are what the CFMS members are saying:

Just joined today and I am very impressed with this website. I have been Facilities Manager for almost 3 years and I wish I had known about this site when I started this job. Looking forward to gaining more knowledge and insight . Thanks Tim – Bill Dickerson

 

Thank you for making this Free! Most churches are running on shoe strings and duct tape so this opens up for greater participation. I have been in the corporate facilities/real estate for 24 years and I am always learning new things. Looking forward to gleaning and sharing. Thanks – Steve Armstrong

As a reminder, your FREE CFMS membership provides you:

  1. Weekly Information sent directly to you to help you be proactive and intentional with the care of your facility.
  2. Online Community so that you can get input and feedback from hundreds of other church and facility leaders.
  3. Monthly Webinars by industry professionals to provide relevant information and resources for your church facility management.
  4. Vetted Vendors will put a list of qualified vendors at your fingertips with the assurance that they have been pre-qualified by our team…and they do not pay to be on this list.
  5. Free Resources will be developed and made available to members including worksheet, forms, policy docs, job descriptions, etc.
  6. Availability to Consulting and Training Services.

Join us TODAY completely FREE!

Regardless of your church size, you need to be thinking about the best use and management of your facilities. There is no better place than this community. It offers the best of church facility expertise along with peer learning. You should not be without this resource!

Thom S. Rainer, President and CEO

LifeWay Christian Resources

Church Answers


Preventive Maintenance: Revisited

The below is a post that I did in August of 2009…but think that we need to revisit it…and how it can save you money in the long run. Frankly, if we are focused on long term ministry implementation, then our facilities will need to be prepared to serve us (not vice versa) for the long term as well. OK…I will get off my soap box…enjoy the following!


As I have studied the Facilities Management field and have researched the cause and effect of the decay of everything that we build, I am more confused as to why we, as God’s stewards, do such a poor job of fulfilling those duties. We would rather put off today what we can go into debt for tomorrow. HMMM…is that good stewardship? Sounds like many government officials.

I recently was introduced to Kevin Folsom, Director of Facilities and Plant Operations Dallas Theological Seminary, Dallas, Texas. He wrote a White Paper entitled “sustainable facilities” vs. Sustainable Facilities. This is an excellent article and frankly some of it is over my head…Kevin is one smart dude!!!!

Here is a quote from this article:

There are numerous levels that can be used to go about this, but to start we have to remember our early Physics lessons in high school about the 2nd Law of Thermal Dynamics. Everything we build will decay, but it may last longer if properly maintained. So, here’s a puzzling question… If we build facilities that the natural law causes them to decay at fairly predictable rates throughout its birth to burial, why do we not plan for it?

According to a research project done a few years ago, facilities…any facility…will deteriorate at a rate of 1-4% per year, assuming regular preventive maintenance. However, this rate of deterioration will, in most cases, grow exponentially if the regular, systematic preventive maintenance is not performed.

So…why do we, as church leaders, avoid addressing and planning for the inevitable? Would you drive your new car and never change the oil until the engine seizes up and then cough over a huge amount of money for a new engine? That does not make any sense to me.

Let me share one more quote from an interview Kevin did with facilitiesnet.

Let’s step back and look at the big picture for a minute. An appropriate preventive maintenance program should be funded on average at 1.5 percent of the CRV (Current Replacement Value) of a facility. Using the Fram analogy, which is much like a really small facility, 1.5 percent of a $20,000 car is $300 per year. The equivalent would be to pay someone to come to your car’s location to provide maintenance and inspections, while working around your schedule to prevent interruption. That sounds like a pretty good deal to me.

So, how much is the CRV (Current Replacement Value) of your ministry facilities? How much are you budgeting each year to maintain these God given resources? It may be time for a Facilities Management/Maintenance Audit.


It’s Not That You Are Wrong…

…It’s just that you may not be correct. Well some of you may be, but chances are, many of you are not correct…on how cleaning is being accomplished in your facility. It is a mistake to assume that the role of a team member dedicated to maintaining cleanliness is an unskilled position. If you do have that assumption, then you do not understand that there is a science, and actual science, to cleaning.

You’ve seen commercials that proclaim the wonders of a cleaner that will clean every surface, kill every germ, write a term paper, and wash your car. That would work if every type of soiling agent that you encounter was the same pH and the same basic type of material. Yet last I checked, variation abounds. Soils can be acidic, alkaline, dry, morphing, or dyes and inks. Each of these soil types require a different and specific method of cleaning. This is where the science gets exciting!

It is a mistake to assume that the role of a team member dedicated to maintaining cleanliness is an unskilled position.

Just like the soils vary, so do the cleaners. Acidic cleaners have been developed for the more alkaline soils, alkaline cleaners for the more acidic soils. Best chemical for a morphing soil…nothing! Morphing soils react with water/moisture. Absent that catalyst they can be simply swept up and disposed of. Neutral cleaners are popular as well because they do not damage certain surfaces (like floor finish). What you need to understand is, the closer in pH that the soil and cleaner are to each other, the less effective the cleaner will be.

There are also cleaning actions that are not dependent on pH. Disinfectants are generally neutral, they are designed to kill the microorganisms that are listed on their label. Oh, and they are registered with the EPA listed as insecticides. Solvents contain chemicals that break down the elements of material to break their bonds, many can be harmful. Enzyme cleaners utilize live bacteria to eat organic material. Fun fact, if you clean a surface with a disinfectant and then try to follow-up with an enzyme cleaner it won’t work. Disinfectant residue kills the enzymes. Science!

Are you seeing how complex the science behind cleaning is? The real danger is in that not only can improper cleaning programs lead to dirty facilities, it can be hazardous to the occupants and staff. Training your team and providing the right information on chemical usage is not something you put off until there is “time”. Training should occur before the first task is performed. OSHA wants to see that hazardous communication class happen first thing as well, and where do the majority of the SDS originate from in your facility? The cleaning department.

Chemicals are an important part of a proper program. The equipment and processes utilized in conjunction with the chemicals make for a well-rounded program. Just like investing in training will provide dividends, so will investing in the right equipment to perform the tasks.

I hope at this point you are wondering if you have a clue as to what is happening in your facility. Not because I want to scare anyone. Rather, I want to impress upon everyone that our cleaning teams are being asked to perform an extraordinary task that can only be accomplished through research and training. Once the work has been done to provide the right chemicals, equipment, training, and processes, you can have a clean facility. We scratched the surface…want to get even farther ahead? May 24th Church Facility Management Solutions will host a FREE webinar on cleaning with an industry leader. We will make the science fun and meaningful. Join CFMS (free), sign up for the webinar (free). Isn’t the cleaning of your facility worth it?