Who Rebuilt The Roof?

I have a wondering mind. I like to do mental gymnastics and ask myself “what if”.  I sit and think about some of the most obscure things at times.  I will watch a movie or TV show and contemplate the back story…but even more about the “after-story”.  You know…what happened next?  Did they survive?  Did they end up getting married?  How long did it take the war hero to recover from his wounds and what kind of physical therapy was needed?

Weird…I know.  Welcome to the inside of my mind.

Let me share one of these mental excursions that I recently ventured on.  Most of you are familiar with the Luke 5 story about how Jesus forgave and healed a paralyzed man (starting around vs. 17).  This story starts with a description about some men who brought a paralyzed man, on a mat, to see Jesus.  When they were not able to get the man close enough to Jesus…they got creative.  They climbed on the roof (obviously not an OSHA approved endeavor), removed the roof tiles and lowered the man right down in front of Jesus.  Then Jesus heals him…forgives his sins…and sends him on his way.

What an amazing miracle!  We all rejoice and the people that day (except for the Pharisees) were amazed and praised God.

However…wondering minds contemplate the details that are not written in the gospels.  What about X, Y and Z…for instance:

  1. How large was the hole in the roof? – if we assume a 5’10” man with some clearance, then the hole may have been 6′ by 3′.  That is 18 square feet.
  2. Were there only “tiles” on the roof or did the roof have a substrate (a substance or layer that underlies something) or any other structure(s) that had to be removed?
  3. How long was the rope or other lowering apparatus?
  4. Where did they get the rope?  I’m sure they didn’t make a run to Home Depot.
  5. Had the friends of the man planned all of these details out ahead of time?

While all of that is interesting fodder, the real question that I ponder is…Who Repaired the Roof?

There is no account of how the roof was restored to its functional form.  The man was jumping and praising God…but what about this gaping hole in the roof?  Did the friends just leave the hole for the property owner to repair?  Did the friends ask Jesus to perform another miracle that day and fix the roof?  Did the friends tell the healed man it was his responsibility since he was the one that benefited?  Had they already entered into a contract with the local roofing company?

Here is what I think.  I believe (I have no proof to back this up) that the friends went back and repaired the roof.  Any friends that were selfless enough to carry their buddy on a mat…up to a roof…cut a hole…and lower him down, sound like honorable men.  I believe honorable people like this would have gone back and repaired the roof.  They would have taken responsibility for the physical condition of the place of ministry that day.  They would have stepped up and done what was right.

Do you see any correlation between this story and Facility Stewardship?  The roof did not heal the man.  The house did not forgive his sins.  The house was a TOOL to facilitate ministry and life transformation.  I have preached that for years…but you also must care for the TOOL.  It is tremendous to see the creativity of people using this TOOL to introduce people to Jesus.  The TOOL played a role in this story…in fact, it was a pretty important part…but…it then needed to be restored to be used again on another day as a TOOL.

Facilities are only a tool.

Facilities cannot save or heal you.

But…facilities can be the tool that can make or break a spiritual connection.  Can you imagine how this story might have been different if there was not a house with a roof?  The paralyzed man may never have met Christ.

 

The Never Ending Product – Forever Beta

The world is changing from a “product” based goods/service market to a subscription based model.  This trend has been growing exponentially since the mid 2000’s.  In 2018, there are very few things you can not obtain and use from a subscription:

  1. Caterpillar (heavy construction equipment) now offers a service that shifts the discussion from “Products” to “Outcomes” based on the amount of dirt you want to move
  2. Cadillac, Hyundai, Porsche and Volvo all offer subscription programs for a car (This is not a lease)
  3. Stitch Fix – Clothing
  4. Graze – Snack food subscription
  5. My Royal Canin – Dog supplies
  6. Amazon Prime – enough said!
  7. Husqvarna – now offers battery powered tools in Europe on a subscription model
  8. Kanye West – First subscription album, “The Life of Pablo” sold billions of subscriptions
  9. Zipcar- to book the USE of a car and the ownership
  10. The New York Times – now generates more revenue from subscriptions than ads
  11. On and on and on…

The one industry that is most obvious is software.  The majority of what we consume in the form of software (remember your “apps” are just software) is done through a subscription.  But that transition was not as seamless or easy as you might think looking back.  In fact, it took more than a model change…it was a massive philosophical shift.

In his latest book “Subscribed”, Tien Tzuo reminds us of the huge shift the market had to make from obtaining software via a perpetual license and the age of a CD loading on your computer to the current age where most software is subscription based…especially with the age of Cloud computing and SaaS based applications.  Prime examples of this shift includes household names such as Adobe, Microsoft, Symantec and IBM.  Part of this shift is not just to avoid producing a “product” but rather that IT buyers prefer an OPEX vs. CAPEX.  In layman’s terms, organizations…including churches and not-for-profit firms…prefer an “operational expense” (i.e. subscription) in lieu of a “capital expense” (i.e. physical assets whether software or equipment).

As the subscription really started to take off, the term “beta” became common in the industry.  This basically means your software was “almost ready” and they wanted clients to test drive it for final tweaks.  Then, once the input was evaluated and implemented, the software was considered DONE!

That is changing as well!

On page 134 of Subscriber, Tzou conveys a story about Google and how for over 5 years their logo had the word BETA included.  Google received a great deal of pressure from enterprise prospects and Fortune 500 companies that the word BETA was a roadblock for those who wanted to invest in a “beta” product.  So in 2009, Google released a blog post saying it was removing the word from the logo. How ever, what is hilarious, is the last line in the 2009 release:

One more thing – for those who still like the look of “beta”, we’ve made it easy to re-enable the beta label for Gmail from the Labs tab under setting.

Google basically was saying that this little 4 letter word…means NOTHING to them.  This was the birth of the “never-ending product.”  Google and most other growing SaaS based products follow that…never-ending development…never-ending enhancements…never-ending improvements…never-ending listening to clients and prospects needs…always improving and never arriving mindset.

We too, at Cool Solutions Group and eSPACE adhere to this methodology.  We will never “arrive” or be complete with development.  There will always be more that can and should be done to assist organizations in being EFFICIENT, EFFECTIVE and INTENTIONAL with the facilities they are entrusted to steward.

Forever BETA!

4 Reasons Why Connecting Spaces Trump Cattle Chutes

When I started my career in church facility development in 19XX (you venture a guess), the foyer/lobby/narthex (for my liturgical friends) was generally sized to be 1-2 square feet per seat in the main worship space. In those days, this space was intended to be used as a place to funnel people from the worship space to the outside or down a series of narrow corridors that led to the education, administration or fellowship areas. There was often a small table for giving/tithing envelopes or general information along with 1-2 uncomfortable high-back chairs…usually not ones you would enjoy sitting in for any length of time, nor were they arranged in a manner to encourage conversation or community.

For all practicality, the foyer was nothing more than a well appointed cattle chute (MOO).
Not anymore.

That line of thinking has fortunately gone the way of the dodo-bird. Why? Because people want to connect. People want to do life together. We want to linger. We want to hangout. We want to do more than just pass through a space to merely get to the other side.

Let’s look at 4 reasons why this is a major shift in church space:

  1. People Want Connection– In “Mistakenly Seeking Solitude,” published in The Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Professor Nicolas Epley from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and co-author Juliana Schroder found that participants in their experiments not only underestimated others’ interest in connecting, but also reported positive experiences by both being spoken to and to speaking with a stranger.

“Connecting with strangers on a train may not bring the same long-term benefits as connecting with friends,” Epley states. “But commuters on a train into downtown Chicago reported a significantly more positive commute when they connected with a stranger than when they sat in solitude.”

Deep down, we want to connect with others.

“People want to connect. People want to do life together. We want to linger. We want to hangout. We want to do more than just pass through a space to merely get to the other side.”

  1. Community– Over the past half decade or more,  the term “doing life together” has become a mainstay in modern vernacular. We are seeking the opportunity to connect with people. For the past 30-50 years the American population has become experts at separatism, isolationism and back yard living…fences and all. If we are ever invaded by extra terrestrial beings, they will report back to the mother ship that Earthlings vacate their domiciles early in the morning…then return late evening and are not see again until the next morning. However, the trend is the opposite. Ask the people of Celebration, Florida. Talk to masses of people moving back into urban and walk-able settings. People are seeking community…why not let the church lead the way in this cultural shift instead of being the typical laggards.
  2. Death of the Fellowship Hall– Several years ago, Dr. Thom Rainer conducted a research project that identified the least effective and “inspirational” type of construction/development project was the “fellowship hall”. While community is desirable, the idea of a contrived or forced “community” setting is not working. Frankly, the dedicated fellowship hall is a very poor utilization of space and tends to become the dreaded multi-useless building. Properly sized lobby spaces can more than suffice for these “fellowship” functions…so why do we need to pay for the space twice?
  3. Third Place and the “Well”– In the early to mid 1990’s the term “Third Place” (thanks to the book  The Great Good Place, by Ray Oldenburg) came in vogue referencing the third place in a person’s life that they would engage them with others (the first place is where you live…the second is where you go to pay for where you live…and the third place was that comfortable place where you could unwind, get away, hang, connect, etc.) The most popular example of a Third Place was from the TV sitcom, “Cheers”…where “everyone knows your name”. In the majority of instances where churches talked about a third place, it referred to a coffee shop or cafe. While that is “an” option, it is not the only option. In fact, I would prefer to talk about “wells” (vs. Temples) as the draw. Think about the women at the well. She did not wake up and decide to go to the temple or “church”.  No. She had to do a 7-day a week event…get water. Part of her culture and daily routine. But she met God in the form of Jesus at the well. After her encounter, she ran home…but did not load up the family station wagon and drive her family to the temple. Nope…she took them to the WELL. Think about that…how can we develop more wells on our campus?

Given the above as well as many other cultural and practical influences, we are seeing these gathering/connecting spaces…what might be called the “commons”…be at least 50% the size of the worship seating with a preferred factor of 75-100% of the worship seating space. If we use 8-10 SF per person for worship seating, that means we need to allocate 4-10 SF per person in the common space vs. 1-2 SF.  In fact, one of the industry partners we collaborate with is trending their designs and concepts closer to 150%. That is a ton of space…and there are times that not all of it needs to be included in the “built environment” but can be captured in adjacent spaces outside the building and create an inside/outside commons that can be equally as effective and in many cases, be even more inviting. If you design your commons to be 75%  of your worship seating, but also an additional 75% in natural environments, you could potentially save enormous amounts of money as the conditioned space might cost you, say, $150/SF or even more while the exterior space would be in the $30-40/SF range. That is a 75% savings.

Bottom line is we need to provide common connecting spaces and not just a cattle chute. You need to determine what is contextual for your church, culture, DNA and other such factors.


The Precursors of Facility Stewardship

For the past 10 years I have been beating the drum of Facility Stewardship. You can search through the archives of this blog and find dozens of posts on the subject.  Heck, we even produced an almost 300 page Facility Stewardship Manual (hint…get your copy today). I believe in this principle. In fact, at a recent meeting of our leadership team, we reiterated that our WHY, as a company, is to “To assist organizations be EFFECTIVE, EFFICIENT and INTENTIONAL with the facilities they have been entrusted to steward.”

This is what we do. This is who we are. This is what drives us.

Going back through most of the information we have produced on this topic, I realized that the majority of the content is based on the assumption that a church already has a facility that needs to be stewarded…and that is true, given the majority of the life cycle costs of a facility are after you move in.

But…you cannot move into a facility until after it is dreamed about, planned, and built. You cannot steward something that does not exist. (What came first, the chicken or the egg?)

With that as the backdrop, the precursor to Facility Stewardship has to include all of the phases leading up to the existence of a facility. I know that sounds over simplified, but that’s the facts. In many instances, the time, energy and intentionality invested in these precursor activities will set the tone…if not the costs…of the long term life cycle stewardship initiatives. Poorly designed and built facilities generally cost more to operate, thus increasing the life cycle cost.

We see the life cycle comprised of 4 primary components:

SUSTAIN: The “Sustain” component is where we (or at least I have in my writing) tend to focus our attention when we think of Facility Stewardship given all the existing churches that have facilities to maintain/steward. There is actually a very small percentage of churches planning/building in any calendar year…usually 1-3% of all churches in America are in a “building program” in any given year…so we are inclined to equate Facility Stewardship to the other 97-99% of the churches that have facilities whom need to maintain, pay utilities, clean, replace light bulbs, repair HVAC systems, etc.

“We cannot look at Facility Stewardship and Life Cycle as a “one and done” process…the term “cycle” would infer that it repeats itself…and so it is with the life cycle of a facility.”

But we cannot look at Facility Stewardship and Life Cycle as a “one and done” process…the term “cycle” would infer that it repeats itself…and so it is with the life cycle of a facility. Once you have been in a building for any period of time, there is a natural occurrence that starts the cycle over again (and again, and again). We tend to start to dream of new ways to do things…thus the need for new tools (or re-purposed tools) which in turn requires planning and some facet of building…then sustaining…repeat.

Given the above, there are 3 precursors to the “sustain” portion of Facility Stewardship:

DREAM: This is a critical step in the process of every facility initiative which provides the platform for church leaders to ask “what if” and understand a variety of scenarios that might be possible depending on God’s leading and the intentional uniqueness of your church. Dreaming is not just “blue sky” thinking (although there is a component of that) but needs to be weighted by intentional “next steps”.

PLAN: Intentional planning is required to achieve a desired goal. Period. Most church leaders miscalculate or under estimate the value and impact of this phase. Here is a fact; You will spend most of your total project budget during the planning phase. That may sound un-intuitive given that you will likely write checks for less than 15% of the total cost of your project during the pre-construction process. However, the reality is that every decision you make during this phase will impact the cost of your project. The “Build” phase is merely the execution and fulfillment of the planning. Do not take this lightly.

BUILD: Building and construction can be confusing and feel adversary for those not actively involved in the industry. There will be hundreds of items that must be addressed and resolved. There will also be times of frustration, concern about quality, doubt about the validity of a “change order”, schedule issues, budget issues, closeout, warranty, etc, etc, etc. It can be overwhelming…but it doesn’t need to be that way. You need an advocate and “construction-eese” translator making “cloudy” issues clear. Someone sitting on your side of the table allow you and your team to do what God called you to do…minister and lead.

Don’t assume that the precursors are not as equally important to the sustaining elements of Facility Stewardship. Taking the above for granted can cost you dearly. Facility Stewardship is not an “either/or” but rather a “both/and” process. Let me put it another way…the Dream, Plan and Build are not merely precursors, but integral parts of Facility Stewardship.


500+ Reasons to Join Church Facility Management Solutions

A number of months ago we announced the release of the ONLY Online Community/Forum 100% focused on Church Facility Management. This community is the only one of its kind and we have seen great response. In fact, we have nearly 500 who have joined to improve their Facility Stewardship prowess.

Want to know why?

Church facility management is the responsibility of all churches…any size…everywhere…all denominations…all colors…all styles. Get my point?!?!  The data being provided as part of Church Facility Management Solutions…the content…the resources…the webinars…the access to other church professionals…the access to vendors and the like is incredible and this is the only resource on the market focused on this topic.

Don’t just take our word on it…here are what the CFMS members are saying:

Just joined today and I am very impressed with this website. I have been Facilities Manager for almost 3 years and I wish I had known about this site when I started this job. Looking forward to gaining more knowledge and insight . Thanks Tim – Bill Dickerson

 

Thank you for making this Free! Most churches are running on shoe strings and duct tape so this opens up for greater participation. I have been in the corporate facilities/real estate for 24 years and I am always learning new things. Looking forward to gleaning and sharing. Thanks – Steve Armstrong

As a reminder, your FREE CFMS membership provides you:

  1. Weekly Information sent directly to you to help you be proactive and intentional with the care of your facility.
  2. Online Community so that you can get input and feedback from hundreds of other church and facility leaders.
  3. Monthly Webinars by industry professionals to provide relevant information and resources for your church facility management.
  4. Vetted Vendors will put a list of qualified vendors at your fingertips with the assurance that they have been pre-qualified by our team…and they do not pay to be on this list.
  5. Free Resources will be developed and made available to members including worksheet, forms, policy docs, job descriptions, etc.
  6. Availability to Consulting and Training Services.

Join us TODAY completely FREE!

Regardless of your church size, you need to be thinking about the best use and management of your facilities. There is no better place than this community. It offers the best of church facility expertise along with peer learning. You should not be without this resource!

Thom S. Rainer, President and CEO

LifeWay Christian Resources

Church Answers


Facility “Management” (Leadership) vs. “Maintenance”

As part of developing Cool Solutions Group, I have met with dozens of business administrators and facility personnel. As I have documented these experiences I see that there appears to be a discrepancy between facilities “management” and facilities “maintenance”. To some of you, this may sound like semantics, but I think that it is much, much deeper than two “words” that some would consider synonyms. Let me describe what I have seen and then let you decide if there is or is not a difference.

First, let’s explore how dictionary.com defines these 2 words:

man-age-ment

1. The act or manner of managing: handling, direction, or control
2. Skill in managing; executive ability
3. The person or persons controlling and directing the affairs of a business, institution, etc.

main-te-nance

1. The act of maintaining
2. The state of being maintained
3. Care or upkeep, as of machinery or property

As I look at these definitions, I see a couple things that jump out at me:

  1. Management appears to define the act of being proactive.
  2. Management requires a skill to lead and direct activities of an organization or team.
  3. Maintenance appears to be developing a way to maintain the status quo.
  4. Maintenance is focused on the care and upkeep of something which may be seen as reactive.

There has been much discussion and many books written about the difference between management and “leadership”. From a pure business perspective, I understand the differences. However, in this instance I would suggest that Facility “Management” is more congruent with leadership than maintenance. Even the above definitions would lead to that conclusion.

What words could be used to describe management vs. maintenance? See below the word pictures that we would use:

MANAGEMENT MAINTENANCE
Proactive Reactive
Preventive Corrective
Lead React
Plan Respond
Systematic Scramble
Save over the Long Term Spend as needed
Increase Life Cycle Band-Aid

So, as you explore your facility stewardship needs, are you providing management/leadership, or merely maintenance?

Food for thought…


Church Revitalization: Boat Anchor OR Fresh Wind in the Sails?

Church Revitalization is alive and well.  This is not the “Church Growth” movement of the 1980’s or “Seeker Sensitive” or some other fad. Frankly, “CHURCH” revitalization has less to do (in my opinion) with the age or condition of a congregation as much as a revitalization of the purpose (the WHY) of the church universal.

We have seen some incredible initiatives the past 10+ years related to revitalization and church multiplication. The most obvious and most publicized are Church Planting and Multisite Church. Both are alive and well and growing in impact.

“We need to be cognizant to not burden the next generation of church leaders with facilities that will become the boat anchor around their ministry and missional impact.”

But there has been an upswell of 2 additional initiatives that need to be mentioned.  These may be subsets of the above; however, they bring an additional set of impactful elements and I believe they have significant nuances that need attention:

  1. Mergers – Our team has served several churches the past few years that have merged to not just “rescue” a declining church, but rather to form a stronger, more vibrant and impactful church. As Jim Tomberlin and Warren Bird have so well stated – BETTER TOGETHER!
  2. Revitalization/Redeveloped/Adoptive Re-Use – So many terms we could use here…but we see a trend (for the good) of revitalization and adaptive use of facilities that have either aged out or are underutilized and/or a “highest and best use” that may not be exclusive of a 1-day-a-week church facility.

A deeper dive into the above is merited, but that is for another day. Instead, I want to share a concern I am seeing with both of the above when we are not intentional. Both of the above are exciting…and they are a great way to not only grow the Kingdom/Church (capital “C”) but to breathe new life into aging church facilities.

HOWEVER…there are 4 critical considerations that both the “giver” and the receiver of such facility gifts need to consider:

1. Functional Obsolescenceis a reduction in the usefulness or desirability of an object because of an outdated design feature, usually one that cannot be easily changed. Here are some prime examples:

  • Not handicap accessible
  • Inadequate HVAC system
  • Flow feels more like a maze than an intentionally community space
  • Lots of stairs
  • “Wrong-sized” spaces
  • Limited parking

2. Incongruent/Non-contextual – In many cases, the “gift” does not communicate the story of the receiver. It may be in the wrong part of town…may feel like a monastery and not a thriving community-centric facility…or it may just be old looking, feeling, and smelling.

3. Deferred Maintenance – “Here is your FREE Building.” – Oh Goodie…but what about the $3-4M in deferred maintenance. Don’t miss this. I have seen too many well intended churches and church planting organizations hand over an older facility to a church plant or even a multisite campus that appears to be “free” only to find they had been give the MONEY PIT. Free is rarely ever free.

4. Uninsurable – Directly related to the above, make sure the facility being gifted is actually insurable. Put yourself in this scenario…you are the pastor of a church plant…you are gifted a facility only to learn that the facility in not insurable or the insurance cost, due to its condition, has massive deductibles and/or unsustainable premiums. OUCH!

We need to be cognizant to not burden the next generation of church leaders with facilities that will become the boat anchor around their ministry and missional impact.


The World of Integration

When we first started eSPACE, I could not get another ChMS to sit down and have a conversation about integration…and yet we were inundated with requests from churches to be able to integrate to their HVAC systems as well as their ChMS. What is a boy to do?!?!

I am not one to give up easily…so here are some things we did:

  1. We developed an HVAC integration with the Niagara Framework to integrate with Building Automation Systems that had a JACE.
  2. We kept knocking on ChMS doors.
  3. We kept developing eSPACE into the BEST Facility Management Software solution for churches.
  4. We kept knocking on ChMS doors.
  5. We developed integrations with other HVAC control solutions such as WiFi Thermostats and XML converters (for BACnet, LON and Modbus).
  6. We kept knocking on ChMS doors.

Persistence finally paid off! 

Let me tell you what is going on to make your church more energy and operational efficient:

  1. eSPACE now integrates with 13 ChMS applications…check them out HERE!
  2. COOLSPACE offers integration with 4 Wireless thermostats, the Niagara Framework and many other Building Automation systems that communicate BACnet, LON and Modbus.
  3. We are in testing with a number of Access Control systems (more on that later).
  4. We integrate with a number of Digital Signage companies.
  5. We have a WordPress Plugin to integrate your WordPress site to digital signage.
  6. Our Dev team is exploring integrations with lighting controls, security cameras and other systems.

The world of integration is here to stay and we are thrilled to be the leader in this area to serve churches. Join the integration revolution and give us a shout!


What Goes Up…

Admit it…you were finishing the rest of the verse to that song. Well, we are not talking about spinning wheels today, we are talking about one of the most ignored parts of your facility…the roof.

We generally do not think of our roofs until we experience an issue. Considering a properly installed roof can last several decades with very little issues, when we notice them it may be a very big deal to rectify. Unfortunately, many of us do not know what to look for or how to perform preventative maintenance on a roof.

It starts with understanding what type of roof system (or systems) your facility has. It could have shingles, be a metal roof, a single-ply membrane, a built-up, or any combination of roofing types depending on the size of your facility. Not just the material type is important, the slope of your roof is important as well. The steeper the slope, the more specialized the contractor needs to be in order to properly and safely work on it. It is hard to make repairs on a surface that you are not comfortable working on. The converse is true as well; a low slope roof takes someone who knows what they are doing to ensure drainage occurs the way it is supposed to.

If you have not gathered the data on your roofs, now is the time. You should have the size of the roof (I prefer using roof squares as the unit of measure), the type of roof, brand/color of the material, warranty information, and a record of inspections and repairs. You should also have a preventative maintenance schedule. The most important part of a preventative maintenance plan for your roof is simple: regular visual inspection.

I know that seems simplistic. The reality is we often wait until we see the issue from the bottom of the roof (leaks coming through the ceiling). Inspecting the roof annually helps us to spot the problems before they make it through the many layers to the ceiling. By the time an area becomes saturated enough to leak inside, there is damage to the substrate, the surrounding building materials, the insulation, as well as the potential for mold.

When we are thinking of the roof, it is also important to talk a bit about flashing. Flashing refers to any water-resistant material that is used in a roof system at the transition between the roof and another building element, a change in roof plane, or a roof penetration. Essentially, flashing is installed anywhere the roof is not able to lay on a singular plane uninterrupted. Proper flashing helps keep water out, improper flashing invites water in. Most roof leaks can be traced back to a failure in flashing. Many times, areas that are deteriorating can be quickly addressed with a proper sealant; assuming of course that you are looking for them every year.

I could go on regarding roof maintenance and inspection…but I have a better idea. Church Facility Management Solutions is providing a FREE webinar this month on Roofing. We will be going over roofing types and how to maintain them to extend their life. Why not join us, hear some great info, and get the chance to ask questions of or team of experts? We look forward to seeing you there!


Leveraging Technology to Accelerate Giving

Do you pay bills on line? I know that our household pays almost all of our bills online…even my 87 year old father does as well. Although I do not see my tithes and offerings as “bills” I pay them online the majority of the time. I am also aware that more and more churches are offering online giving and even text giving options, which got me thinking about the means and methods of online giving.

What should the online giving experience look like?

What giving technologies are most efficient and effective?

How can churches afford to employ new giving technologies?

How do we reach every generation of givers in the church?

Church leaders across the country are asking themselves and their pastor friends these questions, especially as they try to accelerate generosity and be intentional with the facilities (and all resources…including money) God has entrusted to them.

I recently learned of a new resource that can help you answer these questions in a very practical way. So I arranged some valuable Q&A time with Rusty Lewis, CFRE and Vice President of Generis, a group growing generous hearts toward God-inspired vision. He authored an eBook called “Leveraging Technology to Accelerate Giving,” and I got a chance to get the inside details of the book to share with you (You can get your copy of this resource for free, by the way!).

Take a minute and sit in on our conversation:

Tim: Why was it important for you to address giving technology in this new resource?

Rusty: With online banking and smartphone mobile pay apps, we simply aren’t carrying cash and checks like we used to. And that means we’re not carrying them to church services either. But many churches operate as if we do. When alternative giving methods are not being implemented, a chasm is created and giving is lost.

When a church doesn’t offer an alternative way to give, they have actually created an obstacle in someone’s way of giving to the church. Giving should be easy. And honestly, people have already gone mobile – with or without you. If pastors would address and improve their eGiving options, they would likely have an impact on giving for years to come.

Tim: What specifically did you choose to address in the eBook?

Rusty: Several years ago the call was to implement online giving, and today, many churches have done just that (though not nearly as many as you might think). Mistakenly, however, most assume that now they have online giving on their website they’ve done all they need to do in this area. That’s simply not the case.

So I’ve addressed three specific areas in the eBook:

  • Implementing all the tools that make up a complete electronic giving platform – and how they should perform.
  • How best to promote your electronic giving platform – now that we have the tools in place, how can we get more people to use them?
  • Appropriately stewarding the gifts that come in electronically – specifically, what happens when the gift is received – how do you say “thank you” and connect the dots between the gift and the ministry impact the gift allows?

Tim: What are you seeing in terms of generational eGiving?

Rusty:  Younger generations have smartphones by their side day and night. The common perception that young adults love their smartphones has become a statistical fact. And these are the future givers of the church.

Here’s a sneak peek into a study referenced in my eBook… in the chapter on Millennials and technology:

This information alone is a strong case for eGiving! Ultimately it’s the church’s responsibility to meet people where they are and encourage them on their giving journey.

Tim: What other technology-related topics are covered in this resource?

Rusty: The bulk of the eBook actually gets pretty practical. Once you download it you’ll quickly find:

  • resolution to some common giving technology myths
  • teaching on how to reach Millennials (the future givers of your church)
  • guidance on how to remove the hurdles of online giving
  • examples of the ideal online giving experience
  • recommendations on giving technology to consider
  • a self-analysis to help you understand your current position in the realm of giving technology

I even talk one-on-one with the providers of this technology for you. That’s just how important this is!

Tim: What kinds of practical tools do you offer in this new eBook?

Rusty: There are several very practical sections to this book. One of my favorites is a self-analysis. I’ve included step-by-step instructions on how to assess your current eGiving system and experience, complete with suggestions for improvement.

POSTLUDE (Tim): For far too many years, the church has been 10-15 years behind the technological trends of culture not to mention other means and methods.  It is exciting for me to find resources that can help the church be contextual, relevant and intentional in the area of giving.

Get your copy of this valuable resource TODAY.