Are Mergers Changing the Church Landscape?

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I can tell you from our experience, that Church Mergers are definitely changing the landscape of the church world. From planning opportunities, to revitalization, to combining resources or rescuing a church that is in decline.

I am honored to have 2 friends that are the pioneers in describing this movement. Jim Tomberlin (THE Multisite guy and co author of “Church Locality: New Rules for Church Buildings in a Multisite, Church Planting, and Giga-Church Worldwith me) and Dr. Warren Bird of ECFA wrote a book a few years ago called “Better Together: Making Church Mergers Work“. I have recommended these a number of times to numerous churches and they been road maps for many that were/are considering a merger.

Jim and Warren are working on some updates to the data they originally provided and could use your input.  Below is a post from Jim that will describe this further and provide you links to take a survey.

PLEASE help us with this research…and thank you Jim and Warren for your ministry!

By Jim Tomberlin

I stumbled into my first church merger experience accidentally in 2003 (and if you have a merger experience, I’ll end this short article asking you to share it).

Looking for a place to plant a regional campus for a Chicago suburban church, I came across a school in a great location. But another church was already meeting there. I left my card, and told them that if that church ever leaves, call me.

I got a call, but it wasn’t from the school. The church phoned and said, “We don’t have a pastor. Can we join you?’”

I responded, “I’m not sure that’s a good idea.”

I tried to dissuade them, but they insisted.

Eventually, I gave in. With 150 church members from my church combined with the 150 people already in the school we relaunched as a new church. Fifteen years later it has grown to 2,000 regular attendees.

When I went back for the 10th anniversary, of the original 150, about 125 were still there. They told me it was the greatest thing that ever could have happened to them.

In 2011 I co-authored a book with Warren Bird, Better Together: Making Church Mergers Work, about the emerging church merger trend that I had experienced firsthand (and maybe you have too!).

We described how these new kinds of mission-driven mergers were different than the survival-based mergers of the past. We also observed that many of these mergers were an unintended but positive consequence of the multisite church movement.

Since then we have seen an explosion of all kinds of church mergers beyond multisite outcomes. More church leaders are seeing mergers as a church-plant strategy, pastor-search strategy, succession strategy, community transformation strategy and denominationally driven revitalization and replant strategy.

A decade later, with a seismic culture shift in church attendance and changing attitudes towards local churches, it’s time to do another nation-wide, comprehensive survey on church mergers to capture the trends in these new developments.

TAKE THE CHURCH MERGER SURVEY!

If your church has experienced a merger–or unsuccessfully attempted a merger in the past–would you give us your take on our church merger survey?

In partnership with The Unstuck Group, Leadership Network, ECFA, Fortress Press, and others, we are offering several incentives for church leaders to take our survey–and to forward it to others who have a church merger experience. Plus we’re planning a free webinar to survey participants to reveal and discuss the initial findings from the survey.

Just go to this link and tell us your thoughts about mergers. As one of the many ways we’ll say thanks, we’ll also email you a summary of what everyone else said.

Thank you,
Jim Tomberlin, lead author of Better Together: Making Church Mergers Work

Questions? Contact DrBirdAssistant@gmail.com


Now Go Clean Your Room

Maybe it was just me, but I seemed to hear that quite a bit growing up. Somehow, no matter how many times I cleaned my room, I needed to do it again in a week or so. In our facilities, cleanliness is a big deal. When a guest arrives, or even a long-time member, a dirty facility gives an impression…a negative one. It makes people wonder, “If they don’t care about how clean the church facility is, then why would they care about me?” 

I think we can all agree that we need to clean. What isn’t always intuitive is what it will take to accomplish that. Fortunately, you have been given a resource to help you with that. In the CFMS Toolbox you have a Cleaning Calculator. This spreadsheet is there to help you determine what you need to clean your facility, as well as helping you to identify if you are understaffed. 

Let’s dig into this resource a bit. To start, I want to look at the Staffing Calculator part of the tool. This is where you input your current staffing availability for each week. Many times, we assume that our staff has more available hours to clean than they do. Consider this, every time you ask your facility team to help move a package, show someone the way, open a door, reset a room…these all take away from cleaning time. You must be realistic as to how many hours an individual can clean. Many times, we find that facility departments are understaffed because they require too much non-cleaning task time from their team. You may find hiring a general maintenance and support team member is more cost effective and helps you have a cleaner facility. If you are unsure of how much is spent on “other duties”, start with 30% (.3). That equates to around 20 minutes of every hour doing non-cleaning tasks during an eight-hour shift. When you start plugging in your staffing level, you may find that your 40 hour a week custodian realistically has 28 or so hours to clean. 

Once you have taken care of the staffing, move on over to the Room Calculations. This is where I hope you have another resource handy, specifically a document that provides critical facility details regarding all your space. If not, stay tuned as we are developing a resource for that. The Cleaning Calculator is set up to look at certain types of rooms. If you are looking facility-wide at restrooms, for example, you would need to input the total number of each fixture type in that section. When you do, it will tell you how long it would take to clean all the restrooms in your facility once. If you have all the needed data on a spreadsheet, it is easy to take sections of the facility and calculate cleaning time for each area. It is important to provide all the requested information on each room type if you want the most realistic number. 

Once you have those two tabs correctly filled out, you can see what it will take and how close you are with sufficient staffing to maintain a clean facility. With this resource you can create cleaning areas for your team, figure staffing models, and even look for ways to become more efficient with your staffing times. So, what does a real-world example look like? 

Here you go:

Facility A has a 16,000 sq-ft facility. 5000 sq-ft sanctuary with carpet, fixed pews, 6 restrooms, 12 classrooms, 2 offices, and a kitchen. They currently employ 1 full-time (40 hours/week) facility person, and 1 part-time (25 hours/week) facility person. Each person on the facility team spends 75% of their time cleaning and 25% on other tasks. 

Total cleaning hours available each week (combined): 48.75. Total cleaning time needed to clean the entire facility one time: 19.42 hours. This facility has a surplus of 29.33 cleaning hours…assuming they only use the facility once. But what happens if they clean the facility 3 times a week? That takes 58.26 to clean, meaning they are short available cleaning hours by 9.51.  As you start to consider how often you really use your facility, and how clean you want it, this resource will help you set a realistic target for staffing so that you are able to have the cleanest facility possible. Let us know how it worked for you.

By Nathan Parr, Facility Specialist


What is up with USER Based Software Pricing?

There have been a lot of new players enter the Facility Management Software space serving churches. Some of these products are actually really good. Some have REALLY cool features. But…most charge per user per month. I just don’t get it!

OK…I get the “business” reason why. The more users, the potential increase in bandwidth and data storage for servers. But to me, a USER BASED subscription penalizes a church for growing numerical or staffing. If a church has 50,000 SF and they double in attendance…but doesn’t add more square footage, they have to increase staff to maintain a building that now has more utilization leading to more cleaning and wear and tear.

When we launched eSPACE (MINISTReSPACE in 2008), the most popular event and facility scheduling software on the market was Event U. At that time, and even to today, they charge by “resource” which is kin to USER BASED pricing. If you added 25 more tables or 5 summer interns, etc. you pay more per month. That just feels mercenary to me.

That is why eSPACE Event Scheduler and Work Order Management has UNLIMITED users. Our pricing is based on elements such as the number of schedule-able spaces, number of fixed assets and the number of locations (think multi-site). I really wrestle why we should charge more for users. We WANT churches to have as much buy-in and utilization as they desire. We have found that organizations that have dozens or even hundreds of users are operating much more effectively and efficient by having more people with access to the software.

In the Work Order realm, there are some really good software options. I have been impressed by Akita Box, UpKeep and FMX. Dude Solutions also has some interesting features, but most of those solutions implement a USER BASED subscription price. Also, eSPACE is the ONLY facility management software that:

  1. Church centric…over 95% of our subscribers are churches
  2. Developed by church facility specialists for facility professionals…not just a cool tool for a market segment that needs serving
  3. Provides a free Life Cycle Calculator whether you subscribe to the paid subscriptions or not
  4. Offers integration with your HVAC, Door Access and Digital Signage
  5. Integrates with approximately 15 of the most utilized ChMS tools (Church Management Software)
  6. Offers a FREE online community focused on all things Church Facility Management.
  7. Offers onsite Facility Condition Assessments and deferred maintenance identification

OK…I am clearly biased.  But I am 100% convinced that the eSPACE solution is the BEST for any and every church!

Let us know if you want to explore how eSPACE and Cool Solutions Group can assist your organization to be efficient, effective and intentional with the facilities entrusted to you to steward.

*Click the image below to learn more!


The Church Construction Orchestra Conductor

I have been asked many times what it is that “I do.” Great question. I wear multiple hats and perform many functions in our company. My first job is as a servant to our team and to the churches we serve. My second role is to lead the company and strive to grow and stay relevant.

I am sure you would say that those 2 are the cost of admission to the game of leadership. And you are correct. But God has also given me a very unique set of skills and abilities. I have spent nearly 33 years assisting local churches plan, build and maintain the facilities God has entrusted them to steward. This is what we call Facility Stewardship. This concept is best found HERE. That blog also describes the 4 components of intentional Facility Stewardship.

I am passionate about all the stages of the Facility Stewardship continuum. They are all critical. But if you were to ask me where my strongest skill set and expertise shines through, I would say as a church development/construction project’s Owner’s Rep. For some of you, that may be a foreign concept. IT is actually fairly simple though, it is the role of the “Orchestra Conductor” for a church’s facility master planning and implementation of the master plan. Sometimes this is for a new facility. Other times it is a renovation or re-development of a campus.

Let me explain why I refer to this as the Orchestra Conductor.

Many of you know that I was a music major in college. As part of my education process, I had to take classes called “Methods” (Brass Methods, String Methods, Woodwind Methods, etc.) which were intense classes to learn to play all of the instruments in an orchestra. I really enjoyed all of these experiences, but I assure you that you do NOT want to hear me play a clarinet or Violin. I passed the class with a good grade…but the skill set of an accomplished woodwind player was far from achieved.

One of my other favorite classes was Conducting. I loved these classes and thrived at leading bands and orchestras. I was not proficient with “how to play” each instrument, but I knew what they should sound like…and not. I knew when the Oboe needed to start playing and when to hush the cymbal percussionist. I knew when we were all playing in the same beat and rhythm…and when we were not.

I also developed a knack for reading the musicians and could pick up on little nuances that would provide me a clue to some other issue. It was not uncommon for me to see a musician looking bored while they waited for their time to play. Many times these were the “prima donna” members of the ensemble that felt above the need for rehearsal (which is never really the truth). I would take the right moment, in private, to address these concerns to make sure the orchestra as a whole would not be infected by such attitudes or lack of performance.

That is how Cool Solutions Group envisions our role on church projects. We are the orchestra leader. We don’t do architecture. We are not the general contractor. We do not offer financing or capital campaigns. We do not provide audio/vision/lighting design and integration.

HOWEVER…we do know how to assemble the right “orchestra” at the right time so each performs their role in a professional manner…just like my Oboist. They are GREAT at playing the Oboe. They are best in class for this orchestra. But they are not a great tuba player.

If your church is considering an expansion, renovation or other facility related project, give us a call.  We can explore if we are the right Orchestra Conductor for your project. For additional insights on this, please click HERE.


Facility Stewardship Can Save You Money!

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Who doesn’t like to save money? I love it when I am able to save money by either making some changes in my behavior or implementing a new strategy. What I have also seen is that it is not just about the quantifiable savings, but the additional abstract benefits.

For example…let’s say I buy a Toyota Prius to save money on gas. I am pretty convinced that I will in fact reduce my budget allocated for gasoline. That is GREAT…but it is not all. An abstract benefit is that I do not have to stop at a gas station as frequently which provides me with additional time to do other things. And knowing that “time is money” the abstract benefits can actually manifest themselves into real dollars. So in this example, I have 3 benefits…maybe more:

  1. Save money on fuel
  2. Save time to reinvest in other activities
  3. Which can either save me money or allow me to take that time/money and invest in an activity that could produce income, or reduce the need for someone else to perform the tasks.

Let’s take that concept to Facility Stewardship…and particularly the operation, maintenance, and management of the facilities that have been entrusted to us.

Our FACILITeSPACE module which includes the following is a great way to get started.

  • COOLSPACE – HVAC integration with Building Automation and WiFi thermostats
  • SECURESPACE – Door access controls
  • INFOSPACE – Comprehensive system to integrate with your digital and room signage
  • TECHSPACE – Coming Soon! – Will provide integration and alerts with early detection sensors
  • BRIGHTSPACE – Coming Soon! – Integration to lighting throughout your facility…more on this later.

Since we released these options we have heard lots of testimonials from churches that have shared how they saved money on energy…but the abstract was that they saw a large increase in operational efficiency. Here are a couple comments from our clients:

Our church has been a client of eSPACE Event Scheduling and FACILITeSPACE for years. Using this cloud based software has allowed us to save around 25% on utilities and use those funds toward ministry and missions of the church to help grow the Kingdom. Very easy to use product and great customer service!  –Jeff McClanahan – CPA, Living Hope Baptist Church

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We have been using eSPACE with FACILITeSPACE for three years, and our church saw a 30% reduction in utility expense immediately after installation. The interface is easy to manage, easy to teach to our staff, and we can make adjustments from anywhere. FACILITeSPACE has now paid for itself several times over in return on investment as we’ve saved on electric bills and maintenance. No more lock-boxes on thermostats, and no more forgetting to “turn the air up on the way out” after a service or event. –Hank Garner, First Baptist Church

Let’s put this into context. These churches, and dozens more, started using FACILITeSPACE with the desire to save energy costs….which they did. The issue of “behavior” was the root issue with their efficiency, or lack thereof. They would turn units on when the spaces were not occupied. Not smart. But these churches and many others also are seeing the more abstract causality at play:

  1. Reduced run time of the units which can lengthen the life expectancy of their HVAC units. Units last longer if they run less (but they still need preventive maintenance). This means that a church may be able to get another 1, 2, 3 years out of their units which in turn allows them to modify the needs for capital reserves…which can not only save money, but if you have a true capital reserve account that is earning interest, you can actually “make money” by not spending it.
  2. Reduce if not completely mitigate the manual operations of adjusting thermostats and building automation systems for your events and space utilization. This can free up the staff to perform other duties (i.e. my car example).
  3. We have empirical data tied to the issues of deferred maintenance and the number of full time general maintenance workers you have. In every case of the Facility Condition Assessment that we perform, when a church has deferred maintenance (which is nearly 100% of the time) we see an under funding of the general maintenance line items in their budgets and a understaffing of facility teams. That is why they called it DEFERRED Maintenance. We should have done things that we put off…we deferred maintenance that should have been performed. Let’s look at how this can manifest itself.

Imagine having an extra 5-10 hours a week of general maintenance time for each of your maintenance team. If they are not having to turn thermostats on and off…and don’t have to run around locking and unlocking doors…how many hours could you recapture? We recently had a conversation with a church that indicated that their facility manager spent 20-25% of his time in a week double entering events in his building automation system. The event Coordinator would schedule events, meetings, etc. Then, print out the schedule and provide to the facility manager who in turn would RE-ENTER all of the same data into their BAS. That is pour utilization of a skilled person.

The other thing we have learned, or known for a long time but now have data, is that churches are not going to staff up their general maintenance team to a level of best proactive…which is 1 Full Time Employee for every 35,000 Square Feet. I get that…but what if we could assist your current staff to be more efficient? What if they could recapture even just 10% of their time…so say 4 hours per week…208 hours a year? Do you think there are tasks, preventive maintenance, general maintenance, inspections, vendor management, etc. that you could back-fill their time? I will guarantee it!

If your church is looking for a way to decrease deferred maintenance, save energy costs and increase operational efficiency, you need to strongly consider the impact of integrations and automation.


Polo vs. Gildan – The Tale of 2 “Boxers”


That’s right…we are going to talk underwear.  But more than comparing underwear, we are going to explore how this relates to our church facility.  Stick with me.

In my underwear drawer at home, I have a selection of boxers (I am one of those guys).  About 50% are Ralph Lauren Polo…and the others are predominantly Gildan. The other day I was struck by a recurring thought about how I (we) spend the money God has entrusted to us and the ramifications.  I know…underwear?!?!?!? Hang in there.

As I stared at the under garments in my drawer, I had the following thoughts related to their similarities:

  1. All of them do “the job” of covering my body
  2. All perform basically the same “task”
  3. Most fit me about the same…with some variations with the Gildan
  4. They all have elastic waist bands
  5. They all are about the same length

Then I started thinking about the differences:

  1. I paid nearly double for the Polo products…not quite double
  2. The polo have a more comfortable waistband…but I can live with the other
  3. The quality of the fabric of the polo is of a higher grade

But here is the kicker…I had some Polo garments that were 4-5 years old, while the Gildan were showing need for replacement in about half that time. Then the correlation to our facilities came rushing in.

CHEAPER IS NO BARGAIN

In fact…it appears that I will spend the same amount of money over the 4-5 year period.  And if I had invested in the Polo, I would have also been able to enjoy the other benefits shared above.

Makes you think, doesn’t it?


Plant Your Tree Before You Need the Shade

Just over 20 years ago, Harvey Mackay wrote a book that shaped much of my thinking and approach to investing in people, situations, business planning and so many other aspects of my personal and professional life.  The book is entitled: “Dig Your Well Before You’re Thirsty.”

Later in my career I had a business coach that would tell stories about how we intentionally would treat his cab drivers (this was also about 20 years ago…before Uber…but the same applies), the receptionist at the hotel, the flight attendants, etc.   Why was this important?  He said that beyond human decency and respect for other humans (which should always be the basis even if there is no secondary motives) that you never know when you may need their help.  You may need them to provide a level of service that is more likely to exceed your expectations if you have already built a relationship.

In a recent blog, Seth Godin once again provides a thought provoking and yet practical example of this same tenet of human interactions, acceptable behavior and forward thinking.  See what he said here or below:

  • If you wait until you really want an avocado, the market won’t have any ripe ones. You need to buy them in advance.
  • If you eat an avocado that’s not quite ripe, you won’t enjoy it. AND, you won’t have a chance to enjoy it tomorrow, when it would have been perfect if you had only waited.
  • If you live your life based on instant gratification and little planning, you’ll either never have a good avocado or you’ll pay more than you should to someone else who planned ahead.
  • Buy more avocados than you think you need, because the hassles are always greater than the cost, so you might as well invest.
  • And since you have so many, share them when they’re ripe. What goes around comes around.

All of these truths lead to the real insight, the metaphor that’s just waiting to be lived in all ways: If you get ahead of the cycle, waiting until the first one is ripe and then always replenishing before you need one, you can live an entire life eating ripe avocados. On the other hand, if impatience and poor planning gets you behind the cycle, you’ll be just as likely to waste every one you ever eat.

Plant your tree before you need the shade.

What “trees” do you need to plant today? What kind of long term planning is needed to keep you in the “shade” of your planning (i.e. Capital Reserve planning…just saying).

-Tim


Professional vs. Amateur

For the sake simplicity…let’s use the following as definitions of these 2 words:

PROFESSIONAL: A person engaged or qualified in a profession…someone intentional about their craft that is constantly learning and improving.

 AMATEUR: One who engages in a pursuit, study, science, or sport as a pastime rather than as a profession.

Those are pretty broad…so allow me to add some observances.

As a college student trying to master my craft, trumpet performance, I had a very wise teacher tell me the following:

“Amateurs and professionals both make mistakes. What differentiates them is that a professional does not make the same mistake twice.”

Noted!

Since that time, as I have lead people, organizations, projects and yes, myself, I have seen another stark difference:

Professionals accept responsibility…accept “blame” and rebuke. Learn. Collaborate. Improve.

Amateurs on the other hand make excuses. Shift blame. Avoid responsibility.

It is too common in business, leadership, church, etc. that someone is being “paid” for their profession…which automatically qualifies them to be classified a “professional.” HOWEVER…their actions, deliverables, mindset, etc. is more akin to that of an amateur.

As a final observation, I have found that this differentiation is more  of a mindset in lieu of a compensation or “title” issued (I could go on for days on how titles are meaningless if the role performed is not congruent with the title).

I have seen professionally minded people that were volunteers at church…the difference is not about what you get paid. In fact the more a person is compensated monetarily, there is a likelihood of entitlement and complacency…with is not professional.

As you look at your team, are you filling seats with professionals…or something less?

Be INTENTIONAL. Be PROFESSIONAL.


Is Sunday School Making a Comeback in 2019? Part-2

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In our post last week we left you hanging with questions about the trends we are seeing in Sunday AM education programs, such as:

  • Does it mean that every modern church that has worship space and only enough education for Preschool and Children up to 5th grade are going to rush out and buy Sunday School Curriculum?
  • Does it mean that all churches need to add 50% more space to accommodate what could be an insurgence of Sunday AM education offerings?

I don’t think so.

But I would suggest that we need to take note and keep watch. In talking to several church leaders on this matter, they believe that the 20-40 year old adults in their congregation are looking for more connected community.  They want to be in community with others, and given their time starved work and family weeks, Sunday is the best time to do that.  We have also seen more “large group” education environments suggesting a bent toward higher quality teaching and/or broader community may be desired.

I was able to get some additional input from Dr. Thom Rainer and Dr. Sam Rainer (As I type this, the 1984 song by the Thompson Twins – Doctor! Doctor!, keep playing in my mind…sorry for the rabbit trail)

What does this all mean? Where is Robert Raikes when you need him (Bet most of you don’t know who that is)? Here is some of what they shared.

THOM: Many churches are re-discovering on-campus open groups, what we once called Sunday school. Two primary factors contribute to this comeback: childcare is easily handled, and the participants can get their group and worship experience in one trip.

The challenge, of course, is space. Can a church really justify group/education space that is used only one day a week? Or how does a newer church afford to build such space?

The conundrum.

SAM: We (West Bradenton Baptist Church) will not allow off-campus groups to occur in which children are present. There are far too many stories of bad things happening to kids in off-campus groups. Child safety has always been, and will continue to be, a major problem in off-campus groups. If given the choice, I’d rather spend the money on poorly-used education space than risk something happening to a child.

The way we’ve handled our excess weekly space is to open our church to the community. We have a day school and many different groups that meet onsite during the week. We added doors in our hallways that get locked to protect the day school kids during the week.

Given the current times in our culture/society related to safety and security, the ability to have planned, organized and SAFE child care for these “group” education meetings is not to be taken lightly.  As a church, we are addressing issues that were unthinkable 10-20 years ago.  Child security and safety is clearly on the top of that list.

Here is what I believe…take it or not:

  1. God created us for community and fellowship, regardless if it is Sunday AM, Saturday AM, Thursday night or any other time and in any location.
  2. Discipleship…however you live that out…is a critical part of spiritual development and formation.
  3. Online church is great…I love it…but it cannot put its arm around me to pray with me.
  4. I can “self-learn” a lot…thank you Google.  But God has gifted some to be teachers and preachers…I need to learn from them as well.
  5. What we call it…Sunday AM education…is irrelevant.  What we DO and how it supports the WHY of your church is what really matters.
  6. Things change…it is inevitable.  So we need to always be considering the means and methods of impacting our community, our congregation, as well as those who are NOT “here yet”. This means that what once was…may be again, but for different reasons.
  7. Start with WHY – is one of my favorite books of all times by Simon Sinek. Really look deep into your systems, processes, means and the like to understand WHY you do them.  Avoid the 7 worlds of a dying church – “We have always done it this way.” The reason for doing somethings ebb and flow…come and go…are relevant, irrelevant and relevant again. I firmly believe that the Gospel NEVER CHANGES! But our means and methods MUST church.  That is a topic for another day.

Going, Going…Gone?: HVAC Replacement 101

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In less than a second, you get over 83 Million returns. That is what happens when you type in “How do I know when I should change out my HVAC” into a search engine.

You can get some interesting results as you head past the first, second and third pages…but who does that? Results past the third page in a search engine are like the third verse in a hymn…it may be there, but no one ever looks at it.

Regarding your facility, there are some basic things you need to know about your HVAC before you can really make an informed decision regarding replacement.

To begin, what type of systems do you have?

Expected service life will vary based on the size and type of the system you are looking at. A 5-ton unit that you are accustomed to seeing in your home is vastly different (from a mechanical perspective) than a facility that has a cooling tower and chilled water pumped throughout.

Knowing what you have is the first step in being able to determine when you need to change it. It is easiest to identify the components in a life cycle calculator, CMMS, or a spreadsheet.

The next foundational element is to understand how your HVAC systems work and how the components go together.

Having a clear understanding of how the engineers originally designed the system to function is necessary when evaluating effectiveness. The mechanical engineering field is like any other field out there. There will always be certain designs and installations that are somewhat “tried and true” that you will see under specific conditions.

There are also, however, systems that get deployed that are considered cutting edge that do not make the cut long-term. Usually they do not make the cut because they are not the easiest to maintain, which means from a commercial standpoint they are not as profitable.

For churches there is a benefit for staying with more tried and true technology. If you have “cutting-edge” systems or special features that are not maintained correctly, or your service tech does not know all the components that need maintenance, you are not able to effectively evaluate everything.

Consider what subjective data you are going to use as part of the evaluation process.

As you are aware, church members are not slow to provide their opinion on how the system performs. While it is always beneficial to hear folks out and how they feel, it does not mean that it should carry the most weight in your decision. There will always be folks who think it is too hot, too cold, too windy, too loud, etc. Perceived comfort does not always match engineering specifications. A unit can be performing as designed and still not meeting current occupant needs.

Finally, know if there have been any changes to the layouts in the spaces you are evaluating the HVAC.

Many times, churches will open a wall here, close in a space there, make offices out of this large room, etc. Unfortunately, not all changes in room layout are combined with a mechanical engineering review. Your systems were designed to operate with a specific layout. Anytime you change it you can fundamentally change the effectiveness of a unit. It may be operating perfectly, but it is trying to condition a space layout that no longer exists.