The Value of a Guest

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Several weeks ago I was attending worship at Elevation Church, Matthews Campus. Pastor Larry Brey, campus pastor, was talking about our volunteers and the preparation they go through to get ready for the arrival of guests that weekend.

LB (as he is affectionately referred to) said something that totally rocked me.  Here is his quote:

“The value of a guest is based on the level of preparation of their arrival.”

I have written before on the topic of “guests” vs visitors.  I have a strong opinion that words mean things and we should use the word GUEST when referring to first time attendees.  Here are the definitions I have used previously:

“Visitor” – is typically somebody who comes and goes without much preparation on our part or much thought afterward.

“Guest” – is typically a person who is cared for and has been intentionally prepared to attend. Most of the time, a guest is somebody who is a participant…a person looking for a specific experience.

For me it is pretty clear that if you are a church, you really are looking to have guests and not just visitors. We want people to feel a part…to feel welcomed…to feel as if we were expecting them to come and that we cared enough to prepare for them…and to follow up with them after.

To our guests…especially those that may not be believers or be far from God…these intentional shifts can make the world of difference. For the most part, we can make this adjustment to our “language” with little or no cost. Imagine that…a transformational change for little or no cost?!?!

But it is more than just our language…it is our preparation.  What are we doing to receive, welcome and make feel a part. Many churches have a “Guest Services Team” which is great…but unless you have a sense of what a guest is expecting or how to prepare for them, we will default to just winging it.  That is not intentional!

So here are some things that I see at churches that take guest service seriously:

  1. Appealing, current and relevant website.  It is the new “Front Porch”.
  2. Grounds and facilities are clean, fresh and maintained.
  3. Parking lot ministry…this is so critical and SOOO easy.
  4. Guest Parking.
  5. Greeters…and not just at the main entrance…but throughout the facility and even in the parking lot and gathering spaces.
  6. The greeters need to have smiles, name badges and even similar color shirts…and they MUST BE FRIENDLY, but not too pushy.
  7. They pray for the guests BEFORE they arrive.
  8. Have an information area…NOT A WELCOME DESK (Note:  Coffee is an option, I see plenty of thriving ministries without it).
  9. Stable WiFi. (A church without WiFi for its guests, sends a strong signal, a negative one!)
  10. Clear and intentional wayfinding.
  11. Clean and supplied restrooms.
  12. Proper climate control.

What else would make your guest feel at home?

*Image Credit: North Point Community Church



 

How SMART is Your Database?

Like you, I love the SMART devices in my house – Echos, plugs, Hue lights. It’s so cool to walk into a room and have “Alexa” turn on the light or TV or tell me the weather outside or set a reminder or update me on the news.  

eSPACE is bringing this Internet of Things to church facilities, but what does that look like for interaction with your church database?  Answer:Text-To-ChurchTM

Online giving companies brought us text to give. Marketing companies brought us text to receive content.  In 2017 Churchteams released Text-To-ChurchTM , the SMART way to get your people to:

  1. Give
  2. Register for anything
  3. Complete a Communication Card (starting a follow-up workflow)
  4. Securely check-in their kids
  5. See contact assignments
  6. See their volunteer or training schedule
  7. Manage their groups
  8. Update their infoLink to anywhere

You know, all the stuff you wish your people could do by interacting directly with your database!

Here’s how it works.  You choose your own, local, ten-digit phone number that connects to your Churchteams database. Share the number with your people along with a keyword to do whatever you want them to do.

For example, I’d like to give you the chance to see how Text-To-ChurchTM  works for registration, check-in and workflow automation.  Hands on is the best way to learn (you can do this in one minute).  Get out your phone right now andtext SMART to (817) 677-9850.

Just follow the prompts to add a (made up) child, and text the word CHECK to check-in. You will get 3 follow-up texts (1 hour, 1 day, 1 week later) from our Workflow Automation inviting you to a Meet The Software guided tour but that’s it.

Now, imagine what you could do with a SMART database?

  • Give guests and members who no longer carry checkbooks an easy way to participate in giving.
  • Get rid of check-in lines.
  • Offer an electronic communication card option in Worship.
  • Let people register for any class or event by texting a keyword.
  • Text staff and leaders of follow-up assignments.
  • Take adult class attendance on a mobile phone.
  • Automate guest follow-up so no one falls through the cracks.
  • Simplify pastoral care and leadership development follow-up.
  • Enhance church communication strategy.
  • Simplify data management.
  • All in ONE church software database!

eSPACE is leveraging technology for managing facilities.  Churchteams is leveraging technology for managing people and processes. Our recent integration helps churches get the best of both.  Now, that’s SMART.

Boyd Pelley is Co-founder / CEO of Churchteams.  He served churches in 3 states as Discipleship, Administrative, and Family pastor for 18 years. The last 8 bootstrapping the development of the company with Mark Horan, Co-founder / Software Architect.  Married since 1986, he and Pam have 2 grown, married children. They live in McKinney, Texas.

 

Stop Putting Out Fires

Contribution by Deborah Ike, President and Founder of Velocity Ministry Management

Of course, I’m not talking about actual fires (go ahead and put those out).  I’m referring to those proverbial fires where you’re running from one crisis to the next.  That’s what I see happening all too often with churches and their events.  Every ministry department wants to host several events throughout the year (often “planned” a few weeks instead of a few months ahead of time) PLUS the church as a whole hosts events as well.  All of this activity results in exhausted staff, frustrated volunteers, less-than-optimal events, and a congregation overwhelmed by so many event announcements.

Here’s what I often see:

  • The 1-2 weeks before an event, it’s all-hands-on-deck with nearly every other task dropped so all staff members can focus on last minute details for an event
  • No one knows all of the events coming up for the next 12 months
  • Facilities team members are often caught by surprise with requests for room setup and support
  • No single individual has a full understanding of how event plans are coming along or what’s supposed to happen the day of the event
  • Volunteers are frustrated with a lack of clear direction, training, or communication from staff
  • There are a lot of event planning meetings happening but rarely are firm decisions made or actions taken after those meetings
  • There’s a last-minute rush to try and get enough event volunteers
  • The staff barely finishes one event and already has to scramble to work on the next one…that’s coming up in a couple of weeks

Let’s stop the madness, folks. 

There’s a much easier, less stressful, and a more strategic way to host events at your church.  It involves planning ahead, thinking through what’s best (not just what’s good), and being disciplined in your approach.  It’s a bit like eating nutritious food and exercising.  Neither is super exciting but both result in more energy and better health.

If this problem sounds a bit too familiar, join us for the Proactive Event Planning Webinar on October 25th.  I’ll outline a proven process for planning events – one that will help you plan more impactful and less stressful events for your church.  Click here to reserve your spot today.

I’m looking forward to equipping you with a practical, straightforward process that can yield incredible results for your church.

4 Reasons Why Connecting Spaces Trump Cattle Chutes

When I started my career in church facility development in 19XX (you venture a guess), the foyer/lobby/narthex (for my liturgical friends) was generally sized to be 1-2 square feet per seat in the main worship space. In those days, this space was intended to be used as a place to funnel people from the worship space to the outside or down a series of narrow corridors that led to the education, administration or fellowship areas. There was often a small table for giving/tithing envelopes or general information along with 1-2 uncomfortable high-back chairs…usually not ones you would enjoy sitting in for any length of time, nor were they arranged in a manner to encourage conversation or community.

For all practicality, the foyer was nothing more than a well appointed cattle chute (MOO).
Not anymore.

That line of thinking has fortunately gone the way of the dodo-bird. Why? Because people want to connect. People want to do life together. We want to linger. We want to hangout. We want to do more than just pass through a space to merely get to the other side.

Let’s look at 4 reasons why this is a major shift in church space:

  1. People Want Connection– In “Mistakenly Seeking Solitude,” published in The Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Professor Nicolas Epley from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and co-author Juliana Schroder found that participants in their experiments not only underestimated others’ interest in connecting, but also reported positive experiences by both being spoken to and to speaking with a stranger.

“Connecting with strangers on a train may not bring the same long-term benefits as connecting with friends,” Epley states. “But commuters on a train into downtown Chicago reported a significantly more positive commute when they connected with a stranger than when they sat in solitude.”

Deep down, we want to connect with others.

“People want to connect. People want to do life together. We want to linger. We want to hangout. We want to do more than just pass through a space to merely get to the other side.”

  1. Community– Over the past half decade or more,  the term “doing life together” has become a mainstay in modern vernacular. We are seeking the opportunity to connect with people. For the past 30-50 years the American population has become experts at separatism, isolationism and back yard living…fences and all. If we are ever invaded by extra terrestrial beings, they will report back to the mother ship that Earthlings vacate their domiciles early in the morning…then return late evening and are not see again until the next morning. However, the trend is the opposite. Ask the people of Celebration, Florida. Talk to masses of people moving back into urban and walk-able settings. People are seeking community…why not let the church lead the way in this cultural shift instead of being the typical laggards.
  2. Death of the Fellowship Hall– Several years ago, Dr. Thom Rainer conducted a research project that identified the least effective and “inspirational” type of construction/development project was the “fellowship hall”. While community is desirable, the idea of a contrived or forced “community” setting is not working. Frankly, the dedicated fellowship hall is a very poor utilization of space and tends to become the dreaded multi-useless building. Properly sized lobby spaces can more than suffice for these “fellowship” functions…so why do we need to pay for the space twice?
  3. Third Place and the “Well”– In the early to mid 1990’s the term “Third Place” (thanks to the book  The Great Good Place, by Ray Oldenburg) came in vogue referencing the third place in a person’s life that they would engage them with others (the first place is where you live…the second is where you go to pay for where you live…and the third place was that comfortable place where you could unwind, get away, hang, connect, etc.) The most popular example of a Third Place was from the TV sitcom, “Cheers”…where “everyone knows your name”. In the majority of instances where churches talked about a third place, it referred to a coffee shop or cafe. While that is “an” option, it is not the only option. In fact, I would prefer to talk about “wells” (vs. Temples) as the draw. Think about the women at the well. She did not wake up and decide to go to the temple or “church”.  No. She had to do a 7-day a week event…get water. Part of her culture and daily routine. But she met God in the form of Jesus at the well. After her encounter, she ran home…but did not load up the family station wagon and drive her family to the temple. Nope…she took them to the WELL. Think about that…how can we develop more wells on our campus?

Given the above as well as many other cultural and practical influences, we are seeing these gathering/connecting spaces…what might be called the “commons”…be at least 50% the size of the worship seating with a preferred factor of 75-100% of the worship seating space. If we use 8-10 SF per person for worship seating, that means we need to allocate 4-10 SF per person in the common space vs. 1-2 SF.  In fact, one of the industry partners we collaborate with is trending their designs and concepts closer to 150%. That is a ton of space…and there are times that not all of it needs to be included in the “built environment” but can be captured in adjacent spaces outside the building and create an inside/outside commons that can be equally as effective and in many cases, be even more inviting. If you design your commons to be 75%  of your worship seating, but also an additional 75% in natural environments, you could potentially save enormous amounts of money as the conditioned space might cost you, say, $150/SF or even more while the exterior space would be in the $30-40/SF range. That is a 75% savings.

Bottom line is we need to provide common connecting spaces and not just a cattle chute. You need to determine what is contextual for your church, culture, DNA and other such factors.


Leveraging Technology to Accelerate Giving

Do you pay bills on line? I know that our household pays almost all of our bills online…even my 87 year old father does as well. Although I do not see my tithes and offerings as “bills” I pay them online the majority of the time. I am also aware that more and more churches are offering online giving and even text giving options, which got me thinking about the means and methods of online giving.

What should the online giving experience look like?

What giving technologies are most efficient and effective?

How can churches afford to employ new giving technologies?

How do we reach every generation of givers in the church?

Church leaders across the country are asking themselves and their pastor friends these questions, especially as they try to accelerate generosity and be intentional with the facilities (and all resources…including money) God has entrusted to them.

I recently learned of a new resource that can help you answer these questions in a very practical way. So I arranged some valuable Q&A time with Rusty Lewis, CFRE and Vice President of Generis, a group growing generous hearts toward God-inspired vision. He authored an eBook called “Leveraging Technology to Accelerate Giving,” and I got a chance to get the inside details of the book to share with you (You can get your copy of this resource for free, by the way!).

Take a minute and sit in on our conversation:

Tim: Why was it important for you to address giving technology in this new resource?

Rusty: With online banking and smartphone mobile pay apps, we simply aren’t carrying cash and checks like we used to. And that means we’re not carrying them to church services either. But many churches operate as if we do. When alternative giving methods are not being implemented, a chasm is created and giving is lost.

When a church doesn’t offer an alternative way to give, they have actually created an obstacle in someone’s way of giving to the church. Giving should be easy. And honestly, people have already gone mobile – with or without you. If pastors would address and improve their eGiving options, they would likely have an impact on giving for years to come.

Tim: What specifically did you choose to address in the eBook?

Rusty: Several years ago the call was to implement online giving, and today, many churches have done just that (though not nearly as many as you might think). Mistakenly, however, most assume that now they have online giving on their website they’ve done all they need to do in this area. That’s simply not the case.

So I’ve addressed three specific areas in the eBook:

  • Implementing all the tools that make up a complete electronic giving platform – and how they should perform.
  • How best to promote your electronic giving platform – now that we have the tools in place, how can we get more people to use them?
  • Appropriately stewarding the gifts that come in electronically – specifically, what happens when the gift is received – how do you say “thank you” and connect the dots between the gift and the ministry impact the gift allows?

Tim: What are you seeing in terms of generational eGiving?

Rusty:  Younger generations have smartphones by their side day and night. The common perception that young adults love their smartphones has become a statistical fact. And these are the future givers of the church.

Here’s a sneak peek into a study referenced in my eBook… in the chapter on Millennials and technology:

This information alone is a strong case for eGiving! Ultimately it’s the church’s responsibility to meet people where they are and encourage them on their giving journey.

Tim: What other technology-related topics are covered in this resource?

Rusty: The bulk of the eBook actually gets pretty practical. Once you download it you’ll quickly find:

  • resolution to some common giving technology myths
  • teaching on how to reach Millennials (the future givers of your church)
  • guidance on how to remove the hurdles of online giving
  • examples of the ideal online giving experience
  • recommendations on giving technology to consider
  • a self-analysis to help you understand your current position in the realm of giving technology

I even talk one-on-one with the providers of this technology for you. That’s just how important this is!

Tim: What kinds of practical tools do you offer in this new eBook?

Rusty: There are several very practical sections to this book. One of my favorites is a self-analysis. I’ve included step-by-step instructions on how to assess your current eGiving system and experience, complete with suggestions for improvement.

POSTLUDE (Tim): For far too many years, the church has been 10-15 years behind the technological trends of culture not to mention other means and methods.  It is exciting for me to find resources that can help the church be contextual, relevant and intentional in the area of giving.

Get your copy of this valuable resource TODAY.


Church Security – Building a Strong Foundation

At Cool Solutions Group we strive to provide the best content to all that are searching for ways to be stewards of what they have been entrusted. In the past few years church safety and security has been a growing focus. We get many calls regarding this, and work with many great partners in the industry to get the best information out to as many as possible.

What we have found is that security is like any other process in a facility. To be successful it must be done intentionally. One of our favorite quotes that is generally attributed to the Greek soldier Archilochus circa 650 B.C. is “We don’t rise to the level of our expectations; we fall to the level of our training”.

That concept is the basis for our new free e-Book series entitled A Measured Approach to Church Security. This series has 4 separate eBooks:

Part 1: Church Security – Preparing for the Process

Part 2: Church Security – Laying a Firm Foundation

Part 3: Church Security – Building Upon the Foundation

Part 4: Church Security – Supported by a Firm Foundation

For a safety and security program in your church to be successful and effective, you will need to have a strong foundation. This series is designed to introduce you to the concepts that allow you to begin building the best program for your church. There are many references provided, some to articles and some to service providers. Take the time to dig deep and begin building and training on a safety and security program that can accomplish your objectives. Developing your response during the storm is the opposite of intentional planning.

Download this FREE series today, and encourage others to do the same. Develop the plan that is right for you and your church culture. We are here to help.


5 Ways Your Parking Lot Might be Holding Back the Redemptive Potential of Your Church

This week we are thrilled to share the wisdom of a great church leader and friend, Rich Birch of unSeminary.comRich has become a trusted friend the past few years and I really appreciate his insights. For example…believe it or not, your parking lot could be the thing that is holding back the potential of your church. In fact, your church might not be living up to its total calling because of what is happening at the parking lot. Rich is going to unpack this for us below.  Thanks Rich for all you do!

Your Parking Lot Might be Limiting the Redemptive Potential of Your Church!

Cars have a profound impact on the manner in which we “do” church across the country. As the adoption of the car took off in the first half of last century, our approach to churches changed and morphed accordingly. The local parish gave way to the regional church which ended up paving the way for the entire mega-church movement, which became a fertile ground for the multisite movement. We would do well to understand the impact of cars and connecting our parking lots to our ministry because they are so connected to what we do. Here are a few ways that parking lots might be negatively impacting your ministry.

A Full Parking Lot is Limiting Your Church

Obviously, most church leaders are inside their buildings when their services start. Your people might know that you have a problem and you’re never around to see it. Full parking lots are a great sign because that implies lots of people are attending your church. However, if they are “too full” like a packed auditorium, it can actually turn people off.

Most municipalities’ bylaws are inadequate to tackle the required parking spots per seat in the main auditorium. Lots of cities typically only require 1 spot for every 4 seats in your auditorium. (I know one city by us that only requires 1 for every 40!) My experience suggests that your church needs 1 spot for every 2 seats in your auditorium. Most legacy church buildings were not built with this much space and might get cramped every week.

If your parking lot is more than 70% full as your services are starting, it’s time to start looking for better parking solutions. You want your guests to be able to find a spot easily.

Four Tactics for Dealing with a Full Parking Lot:

  • Street Parking // Diving into your municipalities parking bylaws might reveal that your area allows street parking on Sunday. In many regions, the rules pertaining to weekend street parking are different during the week. It’s worthwhile investing the time to figure out if this type of opportunity exists on the streets around your building.
  • Cross Use Agreements // Look around your immediate neighbors and find someone who you could borrow spots from. Oftentimes, other businesses and organizations will be open to you using their empty parking spots. However it’s much better to approach them and talk about it rather than just starting to use it.
  • Park Your Leaders Off Site // Those who volunteer and lead at your church should be encouraged (or even required) to park off your location. Cast vision with them around the idea of creating more space for visitors and ask them to do the extra walk.
  • Shuttle Buses // Churches facing a more acute parking problem might need to resort to off-site parking that isn’t adjacent to their property and might need to offer remote parking supported by shuttle buses. This approach should ideally be the “last stop” before you look at building more parking spaces. It can be a great solution and provide good service for families connecting with your church.

Church Parking Lots without Volunteers Are Missed Opportunities

If your church doesn’t have people serving on a parking team, you must know that people within your church are missing out on a perfect service opportunity. Over the years, I’ve found that churches that have parking teams are actively engaging a group of volunteers that lots of other churches seem to be unable to connect with. I love the churches that have parking teams which espouse an almost superhero-like ethics as they serve outdoors all year long. “Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays this team from the swift completion of their appointed service” … even the postal service can’t claim that anymore!

Your church grows when more people get plugged in and they spread the word among their friends. As you get this group of volunteers plugged into your church, they will start telling other people. Also, churches develop faster when they see more people getting plugged into the community. As you move a group of people from anonymity to community through serving on a team, the church is inevitably strengthened.

5 Tips for Launching a Parking Team

  • Start with the Who // The team leader is critically important for this team. (Any team, really!) Find an outgoing team builder who doesn’t mind asking people to join the team. Typically these are high energy folks because it takes a lot to push and stay outdoors all year long!
  • Launch in a Mild Season // Please don’t launch this team in July if your church is in Florida, or in January if you’re in the upper peninsula of Michigan. Launch the team in a “shoulder season” where your team can effectively do its task before the heat or cold sets in.
  • Consider the Uniform // Give your people something to wear that will help them stand out while serving. Think about the different kinds of weather when considering various parts of the uniform.
  • Training! Training! Training! // Make sure to think through exactly what kind of experience you want your guests to have upon their arrival. Talk it over with the team before they start. Draw it out on a diagram or two for the visual learners. Oftentimes, theme parks do a fantastic job of parking people. Maybe you could take your people to visit a theme park to watch and understand what they do.
  • Celebrate Lots! // This team needs lots of public celebration and admiration. These people are considered to be heroes of the church because of what they do for you. Talk lots about them from the stage and celebrate their service. You can’t overemphasize how amazing this group of people really is!

Your Church’s Parking Lot is a First Impression … all week long!

The first thing that most people typically see about your church is your parking lot. This is not only the case on weekends when your guests arrive, but also all week long as most people just drive by your parking lot.

I’ve seen some churches with a small forest growing between the cracks in the parking lot by communicating that it’s a very long time since anyone parked there. We’ve all seen a worn out parking lot that hasn’t been painted since the Spice Girls were on Top 10 radio and it all looks far too depressing.

Stand back and look at your parking lot. If it were the only thing that people knew about your church, what would it communicate? For most of us, it is the only thing people know about and identify with our churches because they simply drive by and don’t come in. Ensure your parking lot communicates that your church is welcoming and open for one and all!

On a related note … have you ever stopped to consider what your parking lot communicates if it’s empty throughout the week? All of our buildings have their heaviest usage during the weekends, but does that mean they’re completely empty during the week? Does an empty parking lot throughout weekdays implicitly communicate that your church isn’t relevant to the lives of rest of the people? Just wondering.

Is Your Parking Lot Holding Back Single Parents?

Today, 1 in 4 kids are raised by a single parent. [ref] If your church isn’t seeing at least that number of single-parent-headed families in your church, the onus may lie on the parking lot. Traveling with young kids can be particularly challenging as a single parent. By the time a single parent has arrived at your church, they have already braved a lot to make that happen. The last daunting task is getting out of the car and across your parking lot into your facility.

5 Ways Your Church Can Be More Single-Parent-Friendly in Your Parking Lots

  • Designate “Parent Parking” Spots // You don’t need to make these “single parent parking spots” because people do appreciate some level of anonymity. Having spots that are closest to the front and have easy access to your children’s ministry is a gift to all parents!
  • Train Leaders to Look for Single Parents // The simple act of helping a parent with a stroller in your facility can be a sign of selfless love and care. Having team members walk with single parents and help their kids get into your ministry can make all the difference.
  • Have “Fun Transport” Options // Wagons are a simple yet effective tool that some kids love to jump into and get driven into church in style. A next level option would be to have golf carts or even a tram! (I love the tram at Disney World!)
  • Umbrellas Are A Must // Train your people to look out for parents on rainy days to meet them with an umbrella at the car. There is nothing more thoughtful than when someone steps up beside your car with an open umbrella on a rainy day to help you get your kids out!
  • Great (Obvious) Signage // If you have two or three kids in tow, you are focused on keeping them safe coming across your parking lot. It can be difficult to discern where to go. You can’t make your signage too obvious to people. Make it better, simpler and brighter so that a frazzled parent doesn’t need to exhaust their brainpower to figure it out!

Parking Lots Are a “Hidden In Plain Sight” Stewardship Issue.

Finally, parking lots are expensive. It’s not uncommon for parking lots to cost at least $5,500 per spot on a fairly low complexity build. [ref] As a point of reference, let’s say your church has 500 seats in the auditorium with only 100 parking spots. You’d ideally like to add another 150 spots to match the 1 spot for every two seats we quoted above. After factoring in all the design, drainage, curbing, painting, etc., it would be an investment of $825,000 for your church – assuming that you don’t run into any significant problems along the way!

Once parking lots are built, they become a recurring maintenance issue that often gets differed longer than it should; ultimately costing the church more than it needs to. If your church doesn’t keep up with resurfacing and patching on a periodic basis, you can be forced into a situation where major renovations need to be done at a massive cost. No one wants to invest massively in maintaining a parking lot when there are so many other pressing ministry needs, but ignoring its significance may have severe consequences down the road. You should be looking at regular maintenance of your parking lots on a bi-annual or at least annual basis!

We often take this resource for granted and hence, it’s easy to not invest in. Typically, the cost of a parking lot gets hidden as part of a major capital expansion. This is why we don’t consider what an important resource it is to the church. Challenge that mindset because it really is an amazing tool for our ministry!


Rich Birch is one of the early multi-site church pioneers in North America. He led the charge in helping The Meeting House in Toronto to become the leading multi-site church in Canada with over 5,000+ people in 15 locations. In addition, he served on the leadership team of Connexus Church in Ontario, a North Point Community Church Strategic Partner.  He has also been a part of the lead team at Liquid Church – a 5 location multisite church serving the Manhattan facing suburbs of New Jersey. Liquid is know for it’s innovative approach to outreach and community impact.

Rich is passionate about helping churches reach more people, more quickly through excellent execution. He has a weekly blog and podcast that helps with stuff you wish they taught in seminary at www.unseminary.com

Church, The Way It Used to Be…Really?

Recently I was driving on I-85 between Charlotte and Atlanta and saw a billboard for a church that said:

ABC* Church and School…the way it used to be (* I will not reveal the name of the church…but if you Google “Church, the way it used to be” you may be shocked at how many churches use this slogan).

I saw this and just thought…HUH? Really? Are you serious?????

“I believe that the cultural and social changes that we have been blessed with have allowed us to better grow disciples that love God and love people.”

I know what they are trying to say…but REALLY? Do you really want things the way they used to be? Do you really want church and school to be the way it “used to be”…really?  Let’s think about how church and school used to be:

  1. Schools “used to” meet in a one room facility.
  2. Schools “used to” not have computers.
  3. Schools “used to” use corporal punishment in excess.
  4. Churches “used to” require that you wear a coat and tie (that is the piece of cloth that men sometimes wear around their neck…just in case you are less than 25 years old).
  5. Churches “used to” use a Latin version of the Bible.
  6. Churches “used to” require their minister to wear a robe to preach in.
  7. Churches “used to” do all of their music with a pipe organ only, if any instruments.
  8. Churches “used to” print bulletins on a mimeograph machine.
  9. Churches and schools “used to” not have air conditioning or heat.
  10. Churches and schools “used to” require men and women sit on opposite sides.

OK…enough of my rant…but I for one do not want to do “church or school” the way it used to be done in the past. I believe that the cultural and social changes that we have been blessed with have allowed us to better grow disciples that love God and love people…and allow us to impact a culture that is far from God. While the message of the Gospel can never be compromised…and the truths of the Bible never forsaken…our means, methods and approaches must stay relevant and contextual to the society we are trying to serve…you know…in the world, not of it.

Let me share one more example.  I have heard for many years the argument of traditional vs. contemporary music in church. This is an argument that does not ring true to me (no pun intended). What is contemporary? According to the dictionary, it means: of the present time; modern. Simply put, it is what is happening right now.  And yet, so many churches have tried to make “contemporary” an ugly word.  Let’s take an honest look at church music. Fanny Crosby is credited with writing dozens…maybe hundreds of hymns that were made popular in the late 1800’s to the early 1900’s.  This era of church history was called the Sunday School Era as that is when Sunday School was first started. Now we talk about how we need to have music the way it “used to be”…which generally means we need more hymns. But the reality is, the hymns of that day were the contemporary music of the day and were considered trite and trivial compared to the great works of Bach, Beethoven, and other great composers of the Middle Ages. Sounds pretty familiar to today.

Now…I am not saying that the music of the Middle Ages is not relevant or that hymns have no meaning or place in our current culture…but I am asking if we really want our churches and schools to be “the way it used to be”.

Think about it.


Security In The Church – FREE Webinar

Church security, safety, readiness and the like are front of mind issues for all of us. 20 years ago, many of the perils we are having to be prepared for were unthinkable.

In light of that, we invite you to join us Thursday, March 22nd as we discuss Security in the Church. This webinar is provided by Church Facility Management Solutions. Normally these webinars are only available to our membership, but this topic is SOOO critical that we are opening it up to the first 100 people.

This FREE webinar is designed for churches of all sizes and will provide timely information for churches wanting to start or strengthen their respective programs. Our special guest is Mr. Chuck Chadwick Jr.

Chuck Chadwick Jr. is the Founder and President of NOCSSM™ (National Organization for Church Security and Safety Management™); NOCSSM™ has helped churches of all sizes in multiple states with security and safety issues.

Chuck is also the licensed security manager and president of Gatekeepers Security Services. GSS’s Gatekeepers Program™ has trained hundreds of armed Gatekeepers in churches across Texas. As president of the Christian Security Institute™, he trains church security teams in both regulated and non-regulated states.

His three decades of private security experience, and over a decade in the Church security field working with large multi-site church campuses in Texas, enable him to address the unique security issues faced by churches of all sizes.

Chuck’s credentials include Certified Protection Specialist through Executive Security International, a TCLEOSE Certified Law Enforcement Firearms instructor, a Certified PPCT Defensive Tactics Instructor and a Licensed Level 3 & 4 Security Instructor through the Texas Department of Public Safety Private Security Bureau.

Please join us March 22nd @ 1:00 PM Eastern for this opportunity to strengthen the security in our churches. Click HERE to sign up, and send any specific questions you would like to see addressed to training@coolsolutionsgroup.com.


Have To vs. Get To

Three Little Words

Months ago while taking a yoga class, my instructor gave us a little challenge. She suggested we change the “ I have to” language in our lives into “I get to.” This little mind shift really impacted my perspective on many fronts and transformed my attitude; especially with all the mundane tasks I do on a regular basis. For example, as I turned the thought of I have to do the dishes into I get to do the dishes, I was immediately grateful that we had food and a sink where I could wash the dishes. When I thought of getting to do the laundry instead of having to do the laundry, I was reminded of the blessing to have clothes to wash and machines that work. I could go on and on, but I know you already grasp what I am saying! I even used this mind shift with my kids as they complained of homework. I explained that they get to do homework which meant they are able to attend school which would be a luxury for many kids in this world.

Regardless of where you are in life, there is always room for more gratitude and these three simple words have helped me change perspective and feel a greater sense of gratitude for all the things in life I get to do! I hope these three little words help you as well!

Lisa Cool
lisa@coolsolutionsgroup.com