Honeywell Now Integrates With eSPACE


FINALLY…we have developed integration with one of the largest providers of HVAC controls – Honeywell.

For as long as I can remember, Honeywell has been the leader in Building Controls. Whether in the commercial or residential arenas, they have been the leader…and the 800 pound gorilla. With that “notoriety” also comes a certain level of inflexibility, bureaucracy, “king of the hill” mind set and a stigma that they do not “play well with others”.

While all of that may be true, Honeywell has started to provide 3rd party integration and API access to a limited number of their devices. This has opened the door for many companies to develop means by which to allow the end user (i.e. YOU) to integrate their controls with other systems…such as eSPACE Event Scheduler (and the 13+ ChMS systems that eSPACE integrates with).

Our team has now developed, tested and released integration with the following Honeywell controls:

LYRIC PLATFORM

  1. T1 Pro
  2. T4 Pro
  3. T6 Pro (Z Wave, Hydronic, Smart)

NOTE:  Honeywell does not have a means by which we can communicate with their API for their “Total Comfort” systems….which is most of their residential stats.

For more information on the above integration or potential other integrations, contact our team and see how eSPACE integrations can increase energy and operational efficiency!



Going, Going…Gone?: HVAC Replacement 201

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Last week we looked at the Going, Going…Gone?: HVAC Replacement 101

EVALUATING THE EQUIPMENT

Now that you have taken all the preceding into account, how do you evaluate the equipment itself? Obviously, if you can afford it, an evaluation from a mechanical engineer is a great approach.

However, that is not an option for many churches, nor is it always necessary. That is especially true if you have no structural changes and you have common systems in place.

As you look at all the system component data you have gathered, first evaluation point is the age of the unit.

That is not always the primary driver, but it is an important one. It should be weighted with the amount of run-time the unit has annually and if it serves a critical use area. For example, a 20-year-old unit would generally be a prime candidate for replacement. However, if it is still functioning and only serves a couple of classrooms that are scheduled infrequently, that would drop it lower in priority than a 12-year-old unit that runs 5-7 days a week and serves preschool classrooms. The ROI and functional return on operations is much lower on the 20-year-old unit.

The next evaluation point is a visual one.

How does the unit look? Is the paint and informational tags faded and illegible? Are the fins on the coils reminiscent of a braille sign? Is there a great deal of rust and oil marks in and around the unit? Does it look good or not? All of these can indicate a unit that is got some potential issues that are more than skin deep. Roof top units that are severely weathered can indicate that they are either old, or in an area that has environmental conditions that deteriorate mechanical equipment. Either condition increases the need to consider replacement, as well as making sure if you are near salt-water or industrial parks you consider coated coils and other parts specified for harsher environments.

Next, you should consider the type of refrigerant being used.

If it is R-22, make plans sooner rather than later. R-22 is no longer manufactured making the amount remaining very expensive. One suggestion is that if you have several units that utilize R-22 on your campus but cannot change them all out at once…have your HVAC contractor purchase recovery tanks for you, and when they pump down each unit (as you can replace them) store the used R-22 on your campus. Use it for your other units as you limp them along until you can replace them. The cost of a recovery tank is made back the first time you must add a pound of R-22 to one of your older units.

Finally, how is your HVAC controlled?

If it has a proprietary control system that can only be utilized with a specific thermostat or control system, it can be a problem.

If your HVAC company is not an authorized rep of that brand, getting parts or trouble-shooting issues can be problematic. Internal controls in the unit are great, but it should be able to be turned on or off through a readily available communicating thermostat.

When an older unit with proprietary controls starts to fail, it may save you money in the mid and long-term to replace it sooner. A unit that requires advanced controls to operate is a unit that is very inefficient when the controls are not operating correctly.

The preceding is intended to help get you started on the evaluation of your facility equipment. It always starts with data collection; what is it, how old is it, where does it serve, how often? Once you know that, you can start evaluating the rest of the physical conditions.

Trust your instincts, if it does not look right, it probably isn’t. There is a great deal of information on why changing a unit out is beneficial, this hopefully helps you begin to prioritize your investments.


Going, Going…Gone?: HVAC Replacement 101

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In less than a second, you get over 83 Million returns. That is what happens when you type in “How do I know when I should change out my HVAC” into a search engine.

You can get some interesting results as you head past the first, second and third pages…but who does that? Results past the third page in a search engine are like the third verse in a hymn…it may be there, but no one ever looks at it.

Regarding your facility, there are some basic things you need to know about your HVAC before you can really make an informed decision regarding replacement.

To begin, what type of systems do you have?

Expected service life will vary based on the size and type of the system you are looking at. A 5-ton unit that you are accustomed to seeing in your home is vastly different (from a mechanical perspective) than a facility that has a cooling tower and chilled water pumped throughout.

Knowing what you have is the first step in being able to determine when you need to change it. It is easiest to identify the components in a life cycle calculator, CMMS, or a spreadsheet.

The next foundational element is to understand how your HVAC systems work and how the components go together.

Having a clear understanding of how the engineers originally designed the system to function is necessary when evaluating effectiveness. The mechanical engineering field is like any other field out there. There will always be certain designs and installations that are somewhat “tried and true” that you will see under specific conditions.

There are also, however, systems that get deployed that are considered cutting edge that do not make the cut long-term. Usually they do not make the cut because they are not the easiest to maintain, which means from a commercial standpoint they are not as profitable.

For churches there is a benefit for staying with more tried and true technology. If you have “cutting-edge” systems or special features that are not maintained correctly, or your service tech does not know all the components that need maintenance, you are not able to effectively evaluate everything.

Consider what subjective data you are going to use as part of the evaluation process.

As you are aware, church members are not slow to provide their opinion on how the system performs. While it is always beneficial to hear folks out and how they feel, it does not mean that it should carry the most weight in your decision. There will always be folks who think it is too hot, too cold, too windy, too loud, etc. Perceived comfort does not always match engineering specifications. A unit can be performing as designed and still not meeting current occupant needs.

Finally, know if there have been any changes to the layouts in the spaces you are evaluating the HVAC.

Many times, churches will open a wall here, close in a space there, make offices out of this large room, etc. Unfortunately, not all changes in room layout are combined with a mechanical engineering review. Your systems were designed to operate with a specific layout. Anytime you change it you can fundamentally change the effectiveness of a unit. It may be operating perfectly, but it is trying to condition a space layout that no longer exists.


Maintenance Planning – PART 1

By now, you have probably abandoned many of the resolutions that you made on the first of the year. Why do we do that? The resolutions themselves are generally good ones and worthy to consider. The biggest reason that we abandon them is deceptively simple – we fail to plan accordingly.

The same is true for how we want to improve our facility. We probably have great ideas and thoughts on how to make improvements. Yet, come February or March, we are no longer making progress towards change, and we are back to “putting out fires.” Planning is the key to making lasting, positive change in your facility. The nature of church operations, however, means that we sometimes must plan a bit differently.

When beginning the process towards maintenance planning, it is helpful to consider that maintenance can be separated into the following categories: Immediate (must do), Intermediate (between now and future), and Future (greater than 6 months’ time). Looking at these categories when planning your maintenance for the year can help you be more successful as a facility steward.

Let’s look at the first category: Immediate. While this seems straight forward, there is a nuance to it. Immediate maintenance issues are those ones that need to be taken care of no matter what. This can be due to safety concerns, local, state, and federal guidelines, or as a result of use. They could be maintenance tasks required once a year or weekly. The primary consideration for Immediate maintenance planning is that it needs to happen regardless of other events. Immediate maintenance needs are not the “find it and fix it” maintenance tasks.

Examples of Immediate maintenance tasks that you need to plan for are elevator fire recall inspections (and the annual), gas line tests, fire extinguisher inspections (both monthly and annually), kitchen vent hood, and emergency light and sign inspections. This is just a sample of recurring Immediate maintenance tasks that are governed by statute. These are things that every state I have ever worked or consulted in has requirements regarding, and churches are not exempt.

In your maintenance planning, set a calendar (or use a maintenance management system) to identify the days and times these Immediate needs must occur. Treat these as non-negotiable. When you have it on the calendar, do not let another (non-life threatening) event or task supersede. Putting them on the calendar will also help you plan for the Intermediate and Future maintenance planning you will be doing as you will have a better idea of how much time you have in accomplishing other things. This is important; when you consider those recurring maintenance tasks that you need to do, you will realize that you have less time for other tasks and projects.

Next, consider the Intermediate maintenance tasks. Intermediate maintenance tasks are those that we know are a good idea and should be done. These include things like lubing and adjusting door closers, cleaning coils on our HVAC equipment, checking function of floor drains, or any other “manufacturer recommended” maintenance task. We know these are good ideas, but we have some discretion on completion. I may want to check all my door closures every 6 months, but I can usually shift that several months and not adversely affect the facility. Some tasks, such as cleaning coils on HVAC, have a secondary benefit (like energy efficiency) that needs to be considered. Waiting another 45 days to clean a coil will generally not keep the doors closed. Just like we did with Immediate maintenance, we need to put this on the schedule. We can shift them as needed, but we should not remove them. Again, this allows us to truly see what time we have available to devote to all the different maintenance that our facility needs.

That is a lot to chew on for now.  Next week we will explore FUTURE maintenance planning.


Setting Goals For Your Church Facility

2018 is in the books. Chapter Closed.

2019 is just getting started…we have the whole year in front of us.

Like many of you, I set personal and professional goals for 2019. I have been in the habit of setting goals (not resolutions) at the start of every year.

WHY???

In a recent series of blog posts by Rick Warren, he provides some great insight on WHY:

  1. You need to set goals because it is a spiritual responsibility – If you don’t have goals for your life, you have already decided to let other people run your life. When you don’t decide in advance what’s important, you’re letting other people decide.
  2. You need to set goals because they are statements of faith – If you’re a believer in Jesus Christ and you set a goal, you’re saying, “I believe that God wants me to accomplish this by this time. This is what I believe God is going to do in my life.” Goals aren’t just a statement of faith. They stretch your faith. The bigger your goal, the more your faith will be stretched. And that pleases God.
  3. You need to set goals because they focus your energy – Focus is the key to an effective life. If you spread your energy out and diffuse it over a whole bunch of things, you’ll make no impact at all. But if you focus your life, it’s going to be powerful, and it will change the world.

So…let me challenge you.  Have you set personal goals? Professional goals? GREAT!

What about goals for your Church Facility…your Facility Stewardship?  Not yet??? Well then, now is the perfect time to do so. I love “SO THAT” statements. You are setting this goal, and you want there to be a solution. It allows me to put a “cause” and an “effect” in place.  Think about examples such as:

  1. We will reduce energy consumption by [X]% by [X] date SO THAT…we can save the church money and reallocate to capital reserves.
  2. We will find ways to automate basic tasks like locking/unlocking doors, engaging HVAC systems, etc by [X] date SO THAT I can concentrate more of my time on general maintenance and management of the major systems.
  3. We will raise the standard of “clean” for our facility from a “Motel 6” level to a “Hilton” SO THAT we make the very best first impression to our guests.
  4. ?????????

You get the point…we have to set goals.  We owe it to our church…and to God (If you believe in Facility Stewardship) to set goals for your facility.

Share with us some of your goals in the comments below.

ONWARD! 

10 Steps to Preparing Your Facility for Winter

Fall is here which means winter is right around the corner. In fact, it happens this same time every year, so do not be taken off guard.

Here are 10 steps you should take to prepare for winter:

There are probably 100 other things that can and should be done, but the above is a great place to start.

Stay Warm and safe!

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Stop Wasting Money

Seriously, stop.

If you are not seeking and following energy saving guidelines, you are spending money you do not have to. Money spent on facilities, when not necessary, take away dollars available for your ministerial mission. The logical response to this opening is to ask, “What can we do?” I am glad you are being logical, because I have some real simple steps for you to start with.

Step 1: Commit to it. Being energy efficient is not something that happens by accident. If you are not committed and intentional, you will not fully succeed. With the increasing connectivity in facilities management (think Internet of Things), opportunities to save will either change or new possibilities added. It takes someone committed to stay informed to take advantage of all that is out there.

Step 2: Turn it OFF. Find a way to turn things off when you do not need them. Use power strips and shut devices off at night, use time clocks, install motion switches, etc. Anything you can do to create a culture that turns the switch off when it is not needed will make a difference. Consider a time clock on water fountains…why do you need to keep water cold overnight? Motion sensors and light sensors on hallway lights. Why keep it lit if no one is there and the sun is shining? You get the idea.

Step 3: Check your bulbs. There have been lots of improvements in lamping technology over the last decade. Survey all the lamps you use; see if there is a more energy efficient option. If you have older fixtures, there probably is. Consider exit signs; if you are not running LED signs you are spending too much. If you have T-12 fluorescent lamps, you are spending more than you should. Simple changes here can earn significant savings.

“If you are not seeking and following energy saving guidelines, you are spending money you do not have to.”

Step 4: Check your HVAC. Your HVAC is one of the largest contributors to your energy bills. Keep doors shut, change filters regularly, keep the coils clean, and only run them when you need them. Smart thermostats, an EMS system, computerized controls, WIFI stats…anything that can provide additional controls, integrated scheduling, and monitoring is what you should be using. In addition, consider your set-points. Varying set-points between vacancy, occupancy, and events can reduce energy consumption. Targeted improvements in HVAC make the most sense – they provide a very quick return on investment.

Step 5: Plug it Up. This step is referring to your building envelope. Check for air infiltration and plug the leaks whenever you find one that shouldn’t be there. Temperature always seeks equilibrium, any leaks in your building will cause the conditioned and unconditioned air to mix and affect your desired comfort level, which in turn makes your equipment run more than necessary.

Step 6: Keep learning. Similar to step 1, you must keep trying to learn the best ways to be energy efficient. There are many State and Federal programs that you can access to learn more. Check out Energy Star for Congregations for some great info to start.

Also, conveniently enough we are offering another FREE webinar through CFMS on Energy Management on July 26th. What a deal, a free resource to learn how to save even more money in your facility. We hope to see you there, and may you find the ways to save in your facility.


Facility Stewardship – What Is It?

For over 10 years, you have seen me refer to facility stewardship. For some of you this may be still be a new concept. You know what a facility is and you are familiar with stewardship…but how do the 2 go together? I am glad you asked…

Let’s first look at the definition of each:

FACILITY (ies) – something designed, built, installed, etc., to serve a specific function affording a convenience or service.

STEWARDSHIP – (act of being a STEWARD) – a person who manages another’s property or financial affairs; one who administers anything as the agent of another or others.

If you have grown up in the church or been involved in church for any period of time, you have heard the term “stewardship”…and I am sure that in almost every case, it revolved around money or raising money. In these cases, we are generally talking about financial stewardship which is critical to our spiritual life as well as the life of our ministries.

The word “money” is used over 140 times and if you add terms such as “gold” and “silver” the number is huge. For example, financial matters are mentioned more often in the Bible than prayer, healing, and mercy.

But stewardship is not just about money and finances…but refers to (as its definition above indicates) the caring for or oversight of something of someone else’s. The EPA has a section on their website that explains “Environmental Stewardship”. They define it as:

Environmental stewardship is the responsibility for environmental quality shared by all those whose actions affect the environment.

So, how do we apply this to our ministry facilities? Do we really believe that God has entrusted these to us, thus making us stewards of their care and oversight? As I have shared before, I have witnessed churches and ministries spending millions of dollars in the construction and renovation of their facilities…but then fail to maintain them (i.e. steward them). They wave the banner of “stewardship” when raising money to build them…but then neglect their care, management and maintenance. So, the following is a list of attributes that I believe are part of “Facility Stewardship”:

  • Proper cleaning
  • Systematic and proactive Preventive Maintenance
  • Proactive Capital Reserve Account planning
  • Life Cycle analysis and planning
  • Development of a systematic painting plan
  • Proper facility scheduling – this is a key element of stewarding the facility…they were meant to be used
  • Sustainability implementation
  • Vigilant monitoring of operational costs
  • Implementation of energy saving processes (i.e. HVAC interface with a Building Automation System or WiFi thermostats of better yet)
  • Proactive cataloging of facility components and tracking of work orders and service requests

With the above as a backdrop, how are you doing with your Facility Stewardship? What can you implement immediately that would make you a better steward?


WOW – You Offer THAT?!

The other day I was contacted by a man from a church who was working with a committee he had established to help his church understand the importance of taking care of and planning for the inevitable future costs related to their church facilities. He had downloaded one of our eBooks (Church Facility Stewardship) and was interested in other resources to make his case.

As I started to compile a response, I paused and stared at the screen…WOW – THAT IS INCREDIBLE! As the email developed and the list grew, I was frankly humbled and blown away with the resources that we have been able to make available to churches across the country.

If you have not checked out what we have developed (many resources are free) and what services we provide…just take a look at the list below.

  1. 5 Intentional Steps to Establish a Capital Reserve Account –  Free eBook – This was written as a primer for churches that are starting from Square 1 with a capital reserve.
  2. Church Facility Evaluator – Free tool to evaluate some of the key operational metrics/costs of a church related to national averages.
  3. Church Facility Stewardship Manual – Almost 300 pages of information for any church to use to establish and further their facility management initiatives.
  4. Other Resources – We have written a number of books and other material.
  5. Assessments/Training – We also provide a number of assessments and training.
  6. Life Cycle Calculator – This is a free software that will help ANY organization establish their capital reserve plan and project funds needs and when.
  7. eSPACE – Facility Management Software – We originally developed this software suite for churches, but since 2008,  we now have private and public schools, colleges, YMCAs, municipalities and other facility/property managers. In addition to the free Life Cycle Calculator from above, we have subscription offerings for:
    1. Event Management 
    2. Work Order Management
    3. HVAC Integration 
  8. Church Facility Management  Solutions – This is a new membership website that we recently released…VERY excited about this!

If your church has a facility…you need to familiarize yourself with the above items and take advantage of the best set of tools to help you be a GREAT steward!


New HVAC Integration with Network Thermostats

As we have discussed before, the number one cost “influencer” to your utility bills can be attributed to the cost of heating and cooling your facility. And the 2 factors that are the root cause of most inefficiencies are “controls” and “behaviors.”

Most of you know that eSPACE has developed an HVAC Integration feature called COOLSPACE that now will integrate with various Building Automation systems and WiFi thermostats. Not only that, but eSPACE can integrate with many of the leading Church Management Systems such as Ministry Platform, Shelby Systems, CCB, Fellowship One, Servant Keeper, ACS, Planning Center and more (Click HERE to learn more).

Well…we have just added another integration partner – Network Thermostats. While we will not be “selling” their thermostats (they have a very generous program when then sell to churches) we have developed an integration that will allow churches that have these thermostats to integrate with eSPACE or the other event schedulers mentioned above. That’s right…if you have Network Thermostats, or are considering obtaining them, then you can increase your energy and operation efficiency by integrating them to you event and facility scheduling software.

With COOLSPACE/eSPACE integration, you can easily schedule all the events in your facility and know that the HVAC systems will respond to each event as they occur. Not only can you realize energy savings with improved HVAC run-times, your facility staff is able to devote more time to other needs as the scheduling will be seamless and automatic.

If you are looking for ways to increase operational efficiency and reduce energy consumption, you need to check out all of our HVAC and ChMS Integrations.  You will be glad you did!